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Article: Dynamic force microscopy in fluid

TitleDynamic force microscopy in fluid
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2009
Citation
Surface And Interface Analysis, 1999, v. 27 n. 5, p. 354-360 How to Cite?
AbstractLow-amplitude dynamic force microscopy can operate in a non-contact mode, sensing changes in liquid properties near a surface. Operation of the microscope in water at the higher amplitudes often required for stable imaging has been investigated. When driven by direct application of a force to the tip, the microscope is stable over a wide range of operating frequencies. At low frequency, the interfacial stiffness extracted from approach curves is found to be of the order of 1 N m-1 on first contact, which is indicative of imaging via a compressed liquid layer. Measurements of the spectral response of the cantilever and numerical simulations confirm this and show that viscous damping at the surface also plays a role.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174775
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.018
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.422
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLantz, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, YZen_US
dc.contributor.authorCui, XDen_US
dc.contributor.authorTokumoto, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, SMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:47:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:47:23Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationSurface And Interface Analysis, 1999, v. 27 n. 5, p. 354-360en_US
dc.identifier.issn0142-2421en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174775-
dc.description.abstractLow-amplitude dynamic force microscopy can operate in a non-contact mode, sensing changes in liquid properties near a surface. Operation of the microscope in water at the higher amplitudes often required for stable imaging has been investigated. When driven by direct application of a force to the tip, the microscope is stable over a wide range of operating frequencies. At low frequency, the interfacial stiffness extracted from approach curves is found to be of the order of 1 N m-1 on first contact, which is indicative of imaging via a compressed liquid layer. Measurements of the spectral response of the cantilever and numerical simulations confirm this and show that viscous damping at the surface also plays a role.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2009en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSurface and Interface Analysisen_US
dc.titleDynamic force microscopy in fluiden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCui, XD: xdcui@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCui, XD=rp00689en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032680385en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032680385&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage354en_US
dc.identifier.epage360en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLantz, M=7005888350en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, YZ=35071570800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCui, XD=10839907500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTokumoto, H=35353237700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindsay, SM=35595480000en_US

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