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postgraduate thesis: Evidence based guidelines of using music therapy in minimizing postoperative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients aftertotal joint replacement

TitleEvidence based guidelines of using music therapy in minimizing postoperative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients aftertotal joint replacement
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lo, M. [盧銘恩]. (2012). Evidence based guidelines of using music therapy in minimizing postoperative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients after total joint replacement. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4833579
AbstractIntroduction: Patients having total joint replacement often experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Postoperative pain can reduce patients’ mobility, affecting their motivation to participate in any rehabilitation activities. For patients having total join replacement, rehabilitation plays an important role in promoting their early recovery. Therefore, it is crucial for healthcare professionals to develop and evaluate intervention that can better control patients’ post-operative pain. In the clinical setting that I am working, pharmacological method is the major means of postoperative pain management. However, many Chinese patients are reluctant to use analgesic to control their post-operative pain because of the side effects and adverse reactions of the drugs. In this dissertation, music therapy, a non-pharmacological method that can be managed by nurses, is adopted for postoperative pain control. It is used to promote rehabilitation for patients who have undergone total joint replacement. Objectives: The objectives of this study are (1) to review the published research articles that investigated the effects of music therapy in reducing the post-operative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients having total joint replacement; and (2) to establish an evidence-based guideline for the use of music therapy by nurses to control postoperative pain and to facilitate rehabilitation for patients having total joint replacement. Methods: A comprehensive literature search on four electronic databases including CHINAL, Medline (OvidSP), PubMed and the British Nursing Index were conducted. A total of eight RCTs and two non-randomized controlled trials were eventually identified. Results: All the reviewed studies showed that music therapy has a statistically significant effect on reducing postoperative pain. Sedative or relaxation music (music which has no lyrics, sustained melodic quality; rate of 60-80 beats per minutes; absence of strong rhythms or percussion) are recommended in the guideline. The target setting is a total joint replacement centre in a public hospital of Hong Kong. The target clients are adult patients (aged 19 or above) that are referred by the orthopedic out-patient department and are pending for their total knee/ hip replacement in the center. The transferability and feasibility of the literature are high. The guideline is developed based on the evidence in reviewed literature. A pilot testing plan is established to detect the potential barrier and friction of the guideline before the implementation. After that, an evaluation plan for patients, healthcare providers and system outcomes was also proposed. Conclusion: An evidence based guideline is developed for the total joint replacement center. It is anticipated that, with the use of this guideline by nurses, it will not only facilitate better rehabilitation for patients having total joint replacement, but also enhances nurses’ autonomy in their nursing practice.
DegreeMaster of Nursing
SubjectPostoperative care.
Artificial joints.
Music therapy.
Evidence-based nursing.
Dept/ProgramNursing Studies

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Ming-yan-
dc.contributor.author盧銘恩-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationLo, M. [盧銘恩]. (2012). Evidence based guidelines of using music therapy in minimizing postoperative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients after total joint replacement. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4833579-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Patients having total joint replacement often experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Postoperative pain can reduce patients’ mobility, affecting their motivation to participate in any rehabilitation activities. For patients having total join replacement, rehabilitation plays an important role in promoting their early recovery. Therefore, it is crucial for healthcare professionals to develop and evaluate intervention that can better control patients’ post-operative pain. In the clinical setting that I am working, pharmacological method is the major means of postoperative pain management. However, many Chinese patients are reluctant to use analgesic to control their post-operative pain because of the side effects and adverse reactions of the drugs. In this dissertation, music therapy, a non-pharmacological method that can be managed by nurses, is adopted for postoperative pain control. It is used to promote rehabilitation for patients who have undergone total joint replacement. Objectives: The objectives of this study are (1) to review the published research articles that investigated the effects of music therapy in reducing the post-operative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients having total joint replacement; and (2) to establish an evidence-based guideline for the use of music therapy by nurses to control postoperative pain and to facilitate rehabilitation for patients having total joint replacement. Methods: A comprehensive literature search on four electronic databases including CHINAL, Medline (OvidSP), PubMed and the British Nursing Index were conducted. A total of eight RCTs and two non-randomized controlled trials were eventually identified. Results: All the reviewed studies showed that music therapy has a statistically significant effect on reducing postoperative pain. Sedative or relaxation music (music which has no lyrics, sustained melodic quality; rate of 60-80 beats per minutes; absence of strong rhythms or percussion) are recommended in the guideline. The target setting is a total joint replacement centre in a public hospital of Hong Kong. The target clients are adult patients (aged 19 or above) that are referred by the orthopedic out-patient department and are pending for their total knee/ hip replacement in the center. The transferability and feasibility of the literature are high. The guideline is developed based on the evidence in reviewed literature. A pilot testing plan is established to detect the potential barrier and friction of the guideline before the implementation. After that, an evaluation plan for patients, healthcare providers and system outcomes was also proposed. Conclusion: An evidence based guideline is developed for the total joint replacement center. It is anticipated that, with the use of this guideline by nurses, it will not only facilitate better rehabilitation for patients having total joint replacement, but also enhances nurses’ autonomy in their nursing practice.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48335794-
dc.subject.lcshPostoperative care.-
dc.subject.lcshArtificial joints.-
dc.subject.lcshMusic therapy.-
dc.subject.lcshEvidence-based nursing.-
dc.titleEvidence based guidelines of using music therapy in minimizing postoperative pain and promoting rehabilitation for patients aftertotal joint replacement-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4833579-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Nursing-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineNursing Studies-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4833579-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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