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Article: A reasonable balance of law and sentiment: Social order in democratic Taiwan from the policeman's point of view

TitleA reasonable balance of law and sentiment: Social order in democratic Taiwan from the policeman's point of view
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc..
Citation
Law and Society Review, 2007, v. 41 n. 3, p. 665-698 How to Cite?
AbstractTaiwan's political democratization has engendered a contradiction in its legal regime: consolidation of rule of law at the macro-institutional level is matched by the persistent marginalization of legal authority in ground-level social practices. This article uses an ethnographic study of neighborhood police to explore certain practical and structural elements involved in maintaining this contradictory sociopolitical order. I examine some of the processes through which state authority is invoked and applied to the policing of public space, focusing on the ideals of legitimacy that animate these processes. The argument of the article is that historical and cultural factors embodied in contemporary Taiwan's 'idea of police' - exemplified in the trope of a balance between reason, law, and sentiment - are crucial to understanding how solidification of the rule of law within state institutions is kept within the boundaries of a social sensibility that does not take law as the last word.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174258
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.22
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.820
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMartin, JT-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-23T03:14:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-23T03:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationLaw and Society Review, 2007, v. 41 n. 3, p. 665-698-
dc.identifier.issn0023-9216-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174258-
dc.description.abstractTaiwan's political democratization has engendered a contradiction in its legal regime: consolidation of rule of law at the macro-institutional level is matched by the persistent marginalization of legal authority in ground-level social practices. This article uses an ethnographic study of neighborhood police to explore certain practical and structural elements involved in maintaining this contradictory sociopolitical order. I examine some of the processes through which state authority is invoked and applied to the policing of public space, focusing on the ideals of legitimacy that animate these processes. The argument of the article is that historical and cultural factors embodied in contemporary Taiwan's 'idea of police' - exemplified in the trope of a balance between reason, law, and sentiment - are crucial to understanding how solidification of the rule of law within state institutions is kept within the boundaries of a social sensibility that does not take law as the last word.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc..-
dc.relation.ispartofLaw and Society Review-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.titleA reasonable balance of law and sentiment: Social order in democratic Taiwan from the policeman's point of viewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMartin, JT: jtmartin@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1540-5893.2007.00317.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548385835-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage665-
dc.identifier.epage698-
dc.identifier.eissn1540-5893-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249184300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.citeulike1618503-

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