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Article: Short-term exposure to sulfur dioxide and daily mortality in 17 Chinese cities: the China air pollution and health effects study (CAPES)

TitleShort-term exposure to sulfur dioxide and daily mortality in 17 Chinese cities: the China air pollution and health effects study (CAPES)
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envres
Citation
Environmental Research, 2012, v. 118, p. 101-106 How to Cite?
AbstractSulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a major air pollutant and has significant impacts upon human health. Few multi-city studies in Asia have examined the acute health effects of SO(2). As part of the China Air Pollution and Health Effects Study (CAPES), this study aimed at investigating the short-term association between SO(2) and daily mortality in 17 Chinese cities. We applied two-stage Bayesian hierarchical models to obtain city-specific and national average estimates for SO(2). In each city, we used Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions to adjust for long-term and seasonal trend of mortality, as well as other time-varying covariates. We examined the associations by age, gender and education status. As a result, the combined analysis showed that an increase of 10 mug/m(3) of two-day moving averaged SO(2) was associated with 0.75% [95% posterior interval (PI), 0.47 to 1.02], 0.83% (0.95% PI, 0.47 to 1.19) and 1.25% (95% PI, 0.78 to 1.73) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively. The effects of SO(2) appeared more evident among the elderly. These associations were generally independent of particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 mum (PM(10)) but did not persist after adjustment for nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)). In conclusions, this largest epidemiologic study of air pollution in China to date suggests that short-term exposure to SO(2) is associated with increased mortality risk; however, these associations may be attributable to SO(2) serving as a surrogate of other substances. Further studies are needed to tackle the independent health effect of SO(2).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174163
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.088
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.452
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorKan, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorCAPES Collaborative Group-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T03:37:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-16T03:37:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Research, 2012, v. 118, p. 101-106en_US
dc.identifier.issn0013-9351-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174163-
dc.description.abstractSulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a major air pollutant and has significant impacts upon human health. Few multi-city studies in Asia have examined the acute health effects of SO(2). As part of the China Air Pollution and Health Effects Study (CAPES), this study aimed at investigating the short-term association between SO(2) and daily mortality in 17 Chinese cities. We applied two-stage Bayesian hierarchical models to obtain city-specific and national average estimates for SO(2). In each city, we used Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions to adjust for long-term and seasonal trend of mortality, as well as other time-varying covariates. We examined the associations by age, gender and education status. As a result, the combined analysis showed that an increase of 10 mug/m(3) of two-day moving averaged SO(2) was associated with 0.75% [95% posterior interval (PI), 0.47 to 1.02], 0.83% (0.95% PI, 0.47 to 1.19) and 1.25% (95% PI, 0.78 to 1.73) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively. The effects of SO(2) appeared more evident among the elderly. These associations were generally independent of particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 mum (PM(10)) but did not persist after adjustment for nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)). In conclusions, this largest epidemiologic study of air pollution in China to date suggests that short-term exposure to SO(2) is associated with increased mortality risk; however, these associations may be attributable to SO(2) serving as a surrogate of other substances. Further studies are needed to tackle the independent health effect of SO(2).-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envres-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - analysis - toxicity-
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure-
dc.subject.meshMortality-
dc.subject.meshSulfur Dioxide - analysis - toxicity-
dc.titleShort-term exposure to sulfur dioxide and daily mortality in 17 Chinese cities: the China air pollution and health effects study (CAPES)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, W: whuang06@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ: thach@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKan, H: haidongkan@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_US
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envres.2012.07.003-
dc.identifier.pmid22831556-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84866048157-
dc.identifier.hkuros212293en_US
dc.identifier.volume118en_US
dc.identifier.spage101en_US
dc.identifier.epage106en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309303100014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.citeulike11780012-

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