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Article: The application of workload control in assembly job shops: an assessment by simulation

TitleThe application of workload control in assembly job shops: an assessment by simulation
Authors
KeywordsAssembly job shop
Customer enquiries
Job shop
Release methods
Workload control
Issue Date2012
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207543.asp
Citation
International Journal of Production Research, 2012, n. 50, p. 5048-5062 How to Cite?
AbstractWorkload control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept developed to meet the needs of smalland medium-sized make-to-order companies, where a job shop configuration is common. Although simulation has shown WLC can improve job shop performance, field researchers have encountered significant implementation challenges. One of the most notable challenges is the presence of 'assembly job shops' where product structures are more complex than typically modelled in simulation and where the final product consists of several sub-assemblies (or work orders) which have to be co-ordinated. WLC theory has not been developed sufficiently to handle such contexts, and the available literature on assembly job shops is limited. In response, this paper extends the applicability of WLC to assembly job shops by determining the best combination of: (i) WLC due date (DD) setting policy, (ii) release method and (iii) policy for coordinating the progress of work orders. When DDs are predominantly set by the company, the DD setting policy should play the leading role while the role of order release should be limited and the progress of work orders should not be co-ordinated in accordance with the DD of the final product. But when DDs are predominantly specified by customers, the importance of order release as a second workload balancing mechanism increases and work orders should be coordinated by backward scheduling from the DD of the final product. Results indicate that WLC can improve performance in assembly job shops and outperform alternative control policies. Future research should implement these findings in practice. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174119
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.693
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.445
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThürer, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSilva, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, GQen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T03:35:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-16T03:35:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Production Research, 2012, n. 50, p. 5048-5062en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7543-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/174119-
dc.description.abstractWorkload control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept developed to meet the needs of smalland medium-sized make-to-order companies, where a job shop configuration is common. Although simulation has shown WLC can improve job shop performance, field researchers have encountered significant implementation challenges. One of the most notable challenges is the presence of 'assembly job shops' where product structures are more complex than typically modelled in simulation and where the final product consists of several sub-assemblies (or work orders) which have to be co-ordinated. WLC theory has not been developed sufficiently to handle such contexts, and the available literature on assembly job shops is limited. In response, this paper extends the applicability of WLC to assembly job shops by determining the best combination of: (i) WLC due date (DD) setting policy, (ii) release method and (iii) policy for coordinating the progress of work orders. When DDs are predominantly set by the company, the DD setting policy should play the leading role while the role of order release should be limited and the progress of work orders should not be co-ordinated in accordance with the DD of the final product. But when DDs are predominantly specified by customers, the importance of order release as a second workload balancing mechanism increases and work orders should be coordinated by backward scheduling from the DD of the final product. Results indicate that WLC can improve performance in assembly job shops and outperform alternative control policies. Future research should implement these findings in practice. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207543.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Production Researchen_US
dc.subjectAssembly job shop-
dc.subjectCustomer enquiries-
dc.subjectJob shop-
dc.subjectRelease methods-
dc.subjectWorkload control-
dc.titleThe application of workload control in assembly job shops: an assessment by simulationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailStevenson, M: m.stevenson@lancaster.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, GQ: gqhuang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, GQ=rp00118en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207543.2011.631600-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867085910-
dc.identifier.hkuros212382en_US
dc.identifier.issue50en_US
dc.identifier.spage5048en_US
dc.identifier.epage5062en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309687700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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