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Postgraduate Thesis: Perfectionism, social connectedness, and academic self-efficacy in average and academically talented primary school students in HongKong
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TitlePerfectionism, social connectedness, and academic self-efficacy in average and academically talented primary school students in HongKong
 
AuthorsFong, Wai-tsz, Ricci.
方蔚子.
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractThis research aimed to explore the phenomenon of perfectionism in Hong Kong Chinese primary school students, including those with academic talents, and to delineate any causal relationships among perfectionism, social connectedness and academic self-efficacy. To this end, three sequential studies were designed. Study One aimed to develop and validate a version of the Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale (AMPS) translated into Chinese. This instrument permits the examination of various dimensions of perfectionism and made available a reliable perfectionism measure for use in Study Two. The Chinese version of AMPS is now available to other researchers for future perfectionism studies with Chinese students. In Study One, 599 fourth to sixth grade students completed the Chinese version of the AMPS. It was found that perfectionism in this population could be considered in terms of four dimensions, namely: Compulsiveness, Sensitivity to Mistakes, Contingent Self-Esteem, and Need for Admiration. All the dimensions were positively inter-correlated. Study Two then aimed to use the validated Chinese version of AMPS to help develop a causal model to illustrate the direct predictive power of perfectionism on academic self-efficacy, and its indirect influence through the mediation of social connectedness. For this purpose, a structural equation modeling was used. A sample of 1425 fourth to sixth grade students completed a detailed questionnaire which assessed their perfectionism, their perceived social connectedness, and their academic self-efficacy. The results confirmed perfectionism as a significant and direct predictor of academic self-efficacy, and identified social connectedness as an indirect but reliable mediator in the causal relationship between perfectionism and academic self-efficacy. Study Thee focused on academically talented students in fourth to sixth grades. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 students nominated by their teachers as “academically talented”. The aim was to collect qualitative data to supplement the quantitative findings already obtained in Study One and Study Two. In particular, the purpose was to investigate conception of perfectionism, as well as the relationships among perfectionism, social connectedness, and academic self-efficacy in academically talented Chinese students. The findings showed Compulsiveness, Sensitivity to Mistakes, and Need for Admiration to be influential dimensions within these students’ conceptions of perfectionism but, together, all four dimensions of perfectionism directly influenced students’ perceived academic competence. Students’ perfectionism was also found to be influenced by their perceived connectedness to their families, teachers, peers and school. Perceived social connectedness, in turn, played an important role in determining academic self-efficacy. Stemming from ecological theory and social cognitive theory, this research has provided an interactive framework for understanding the personal-social development of Chinese primary school students, particularly the academically talented. The quantitative and qualitative findings have pointed to the importance of cultural diversity in understanding perfectionism and social connectedness, and for appreciating the early impact perfectionism has on Chinese students. The implications of the findings are discussed, with due attention given to relevant theories, research methodology, directions for future research, and guidance and counseling.
 
AdvisorsYuen, MT
 
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
 
SubjectPerfectionism (Personality trait)
School children - Social networks - China - Hong Kong.
Self-efficacy.
Academic achievement - China - Hong Kong.
 
Dept/ProgramEducation
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.advisorYuen, MT
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, Wai-tsz, Ricci.
 
dc.contributor.author方蔚子.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThis research aimed to explore the phenomenon of perfectionism in Hong Kong Chinese primary school students, including those with academic talents, and to delineate any causal relationships among perfectionism, social connectedness and academic self-efficacy. To this end, three sequential studies were designed. Study One aimed to develop and validate a version of the Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale (AMPS) translated into Chinese. This instrument permits the examination of various dimensions of perfectionism and made available a reliable perfectionism measure for use in Study Two. The Chinese version of AMPS is now available to other researchers for future perfectionism studies with Chinese students. In Study One, 599 fourth to sixth grade students completed the Chinese version of the AMPS. It was found that perfectionism in this population could be considered in terms of four dimensions, namely: Compulsiveness, Sensitivity to Mistakes, Contingent Self-Esteem, and Need for Admiration. All the dimensions were positively inter-correlated. Study Two then aimed to use the validated Chinese version of AMPS to help develop a causal model to illustrate the direct predictive power of perfectionism on academic self-efficacy, and its indirect influence through the mediation of social connectedness. For this purpose, a structural equation modeling was used. A sample of 1425 fourth to sixth grade students completed a detailed questionnaire which assessed their perfectionism, their perceived social connectedness, and their academic self-efficacy. The results confirmed perfectionism as a significant and direct predictor of academic self-efficacy, and identified social connectedness as an indirect but reliable mediator in the causal relationship between perfectionism and academic self-efficacy. Study Thee focused on academically talented students in fourth to sixth grades. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 students nominated by their teachers as “academically talented”. The aim was to collect qualitative data to supplement the quantitative findings already obtained in Study One and Study Two. In particular, the purpose was to investigate conception of perfectionism, as well as the relationships among perfectionism, social connectedness, and academic self-efficacy in academically talented Chinese students. The findings showed Compulsiveness, Sensitivity to Mistakes, and Need for Admiration to be influential dimensions within these students’ conceptions of perfectionism but, together, all four dimensions of perfectionism directly influenced students’ perceived academic competence. Students’ perfectionism was also found to be influenced by their perceived connectedness to their families, teachers, peers and school. Perceived social connectedness, in turn, played an important role in determining academic self-efficacy. Stemming from ecological theory and social cognitive theory, this research has provided an interactive framework for understanding the personal-social development of Chinese primary school students, particularly the academically talented. The quantitative and qualitative findings have pointed to the importance of cultural diversity in understanding perfectionism and social connectedness, and for appreciating the early impact perfectionism has on Chinese students. The implications of the findings are discussed, with due attention given to relevant theories, research methodology, directions for future research, and guidance and counseling.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation
 
dc.description.thesisleveldoctoral
 
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4832982
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48329824
 
dc.subject.lcshPerfectionism (Personality trait)
 
dc.subject.lcshSchool children - Social networks - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.subject.lcshSelf-efficacy.
 
dc.subject.lcshAcademic achievement - China - Hong Kong.
 
dc.titlePerfectionism, social connectedness, and academic self-efficacy in average and academically talented primary school students in HongKong
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<description.abstract>&#65279;This research aimed to explore the phenomenon of perfectionism in Hong Kong Chinese primary school students, including those with academic talents, and to delineate any causal relationships among perfectionism, social connectedness and academic self-efficacy. To this end, three sequential studies were designed.



Study One aimed to develop and validate a version of the Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale (AMPS) translated into Chinese. This instrument permits the examination of various dimensions of perfectionism and made available a reliable perfectionism measure for use in Study Two. The Chinese version of AMPS is now available to other researchers for future perfectionism studies with Chinese students. In Study One, 599 fourth to sixth grade students completed the Chinese version of the AMPS. It was found that perfectionism in this population could be considered in terms of four dimensions, namely: Compulsiveness, Sensitivity to Mistakes, Contingent Self-Esteem, and Need for Admiration. All the dimensions were positively inter-correlated.



Study Two then aimed to use the validated Chinese version of AMPS to help develop a causal model to illustrate the direct predictive power of perfectionism on academic self-efficacy, and its indirect influence through the mediation of social connectedness. For this purpose, a structural equation modeling was used. A sample of 1425 fourth to sixth grade students completed a detailed questionnaire which assessed their perfectionism, their perceived social connectedness, and their academic self-efficacy. The results confirmed perfectionism as a significant and direct predictor of academic self-efficacy, and identified social connectedness as an indirect but reliable mediator in the causal relationship between perfectionism and academic self-efficacy.



Study Thee focused on academically talented students in fourth to sixth grades. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 students nominated by their teachers as &#8220;academically talented&#8221;. The aim was to collect qualitative data to supplement the quantitative findings already obtained in Study One and Study Two. In particular, the purpose was to investigate conception of perfectionism, as well as the relationships among perfectionism, social connectedness, and academic self-efficacy in academically talented Chinese students. The findings showed Compulsiveness, Sensitivity to Mistakes, and Need for Admiration to be influential dimensions within these students&#8217; conceptions of perfectionism but, together, all four dimensions of perfectionism directly influenced students&#8217; perceived academic competence. Students&#8217; perfectionism was also found to be influenced by their perceived connectedness to their families, teachers, peers and school. Perceived social connectedness, in turn, played an important role in determining academic self-efficacy.



Stemming from ecological theory and social cognitive theory, this research has provided an interactive framework for understanding the personal-social development of Chinese primary school students, particularly the academically talented. The quantitative and qualitative findings have pointed to the importance of cultural diversity in understanding perfectionism and social connectedness, and for appreciating the early impact perfectionism has on Chinese students. The implications of the findings are discussed, with due attention given to relevant theories, research methodology, directions for future research, and guidance and counseling.</description.abstract>
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