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postgraduate thesis: Development of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for detection of macrolide resistance of mycoplasma pneumoniae directly from clinicalspecimens

TitleDevelopment of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for detection of macrolide resistance of mycoplasma pneumoniae directly from clinicalspecimens
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
AbstractIntroduction: Mycoplasma pneumoniae(M. pneumoniae) causes 10% to 30% of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The commonly used first-line antibiotic macrolide (ML) against respiratory tract infection may lead to the increase of ML-resistant M. pneumoniaeinfection. To resolve the problem, a rapid and accurate method for detection of ML-resistant M. pneumoniaeis necessary for treatment adjustment. Aims: The study aims to (1) develop a rapid method for diagnosis of ML-resistance of M. pneumoniaedirectly from clinical specimens; and (2) investigate the prevalence of M. pneumoniaeand ML-resistant M. pneumoniae. Methods: The M. pneumoniaeqPCR results of 689 respiratory tract samples from Queen Mary Hospital collected during April 2010 to May of 2012 were analyzed. Positive nucleic acid from M. pneumoniaeqPCR samples were tested with SimpleProbe real-time PCR coupled to melting curve analysis (SimpleProbe PCR), pyrosequencing and 23S rRNA gene sequencing(23S sequencing) for detection of ML-resistance. Results: A total of 111 samples (16.11%) in 689respiratory tract samples were found M. pneumoniaepositive by qPCR. Of 111, 96 positive nucleic acids were available for this study. Overall, 29 (30.21%, n=96) of ML-resistant M. pneumoniaewere found. 23S sequencing identified 28 mutants (29.17%) and 62 wild–type (64.58%), while 6 (6.25%) of them are failed to be identified. Pyrosequencing identified 28 mutants (29.17%) and 63 wild–type (65.63%), while 5 (5.21%) of them are failed to be identified. The SimpleProbe PCR identified 29 mutants (30.21%) and 65 wild–type (67.71%), while 2 (2.08%) of them are failed to be identified. All ML-resistant M. pneumoniaepositives were found to have A2063G mutation either by 23S sequencing or pyrosequencing. Conclusion: From this study, SimpleProbe PCR is the most sensitive and simple to perform. Therefore, it is highly recommended to be included in the routine testing with positive M. pneumoniaesamples for diagnosis of ML-resistant strain. 23S sequencing or pyrosequencing is recommended to use as a confirmatory test if necessary.
DegreeMaster of Medical Sciences
SubjectMycoplasma pneumoniae infections - Molecular diagnosis.
Dept/ProgramMicrobiology

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wai-ka, Betsy.-
dc.contributor.author陳慧嘉.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Mycoplasma pneumoniae(M. pneumoniae) causes 10% to 30% of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The commonly used first-line antibiotic macrolide (ML) against respiratory tract infection may lead to the increase of ML-resistant M. pneumoniaeinfection. To resolve the problem, a rapid and accurate method for detection of ML-resistant M. pneumoniaeis necessary for treatment adjustment. Aims: The study aims to (1) develop a rapid method for diagnosis of ML-resistance of M. pneumoniaedirectly from clinical specimens; and (2) investigate the prevalence of M. pneumoniaeand ML-resistant M. pneumoniae. Methods: The M. pneumoniaeqPCR results of 689 respiratory tract samples from Queen Mary Hospital collected during April 2010 to May of 2012 were analyzed. Positive nucleic acid from M. pneumoniaeqPCR samples were tested with SimpleProbe real-time PCR coupled to melting curve analysis (SimpleProbe PCR), pyrosequencing and 23S rRNA gene sequencing(23S sequencing) for detection of ML-resistance. Results: A total of 111 samples (16.11%) in 689respiratory tract samples were found M. pneumoniaepositive by qPCR. Of 111, 96 positive nucleic acids were available for this study. Overall, 29 (30.21%, n=96) of ML-resistant M. pneumoniaewere found. 23S sequencing identified 28 mutants (29.17%) and 62 wild–type (64.58%), while 6 (6.25%) of them are failed to be identified. Pyrosequencing identified 28 mutants (29.17%) and 63 wild–type (65.63%), while 5 (5.21%) of them are failed to be identified. The SimpleProbe PCR identified 29 mutants (30.21%) and 65 wild–type (67.71%), while 2 (2.08%) of them are failed to be identified. All ML-resistant M. pneumoniaepositives were found to have A2063G mutation either by 23S sequencing or pyrosequencing. Conclusion: From this study, SimpleProbe PCR is the most sensitive and simple to perform. Therefore, it is highly recommended to be included in the routine testing with positive M. pneumoniaesamples for diagnosis of ML-resistant strain. 23S sequencing or pyrosequencing is recommended to use as a confirmatory test if necessary.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48333529-
dc.subject.lcshMycoplasma pneumoniae infections - Molecular diagnosis.-
dc.titleDevelopment of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for detection of macrolide resistance of mycoplasma pneumoniae directly from clinicalspecimens-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4833352-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Medical Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineMicrobiology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4833352-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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