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Postgraduate Thesis: The securitisation of HIV/AIDS: China and India
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TitleThe securitisation of HIV/AIDS: China and India
 
AuthorsLo, Yuk-ping
盧鈺苹
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractSecuritisation theory has made significant contributions to security studies. However, the theory is not without theoretical and empirical shortcomings. Notably, a lack of operationalisation and differentiation has led to a binary classification of results as either ‘securitised or not’. In addition, the presence of Euro-centric assumptions has weakened the theory’s applicability in non-Western contexts. This thesis develops a new framework featuring a typology with eight branches of securitisation. The thesis then uses that framework to study HIV/AIDS securitisation in two Asian countries: China and India. The process of HIV/AIDS securitisation in both countries is illustrated chronologically. Following the international HIV/AIDS securitisation obtained in 2000, the study shows that HIV/AIDS has been fully securitised by both national governments since 2004. However, the Chinese government addressed HIV/AIDS through a stand-alone programme, whereas India’s national HIV/AIDS programme was integrated into its primary health care system. Six cities were included in the detailed empirical analysis: Beijing, Shanghai, and Kunming in China, and New Delhi, Mumbai, and Imphal in India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted amongst 62 individuals working in HIV/AIDS-related non-governmental organisations, and 10 officials working in government agencies. Chinese respondents were receptive to framing the threat and handling of HIV/AIDS, yet many grassroots organizations lacked opportunities to participate in the national HIV/AIDS programme. In contrast, such groups were strongly involved in national HIV/AIDS interventions; however, Indian government efforts in fully securitising HIV/AIDS were largely faded out. The thesis therefore responds to the major theoretical and empirical shortcomings identified by security scholars. The thesis also advances the existing knowledge of security studies in general, and HIV/AIDS securitisation processes in the non-Western world in particular.
 
AdvisorsHolliday, IM
 
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
 
SubjectHuman security - China.
Human security - India.
AIDS (Disease) - Social aspects - China.
AIDS (Disease) - Social aspects - India.
HIV infections - Social aspects - China.
HIV infections - Social aspects - India.
 
Dept/ProgramHumanities and Social Sciences
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.advisorHolliday, IM
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, Yuk-ping
 
dc.contributor.author盧鈺苹
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractSecuritisation theory has made significant contributions to security studies. However, the theory is not without theoretical and empirical shortcomings. Notably, a lack of operationalisation and differentiation has led to a binary classification of results as either ‘securitised or not’. In addition, the presence of Euro-centric assumptions has weakened the theory’s applicability in non-Western contexts. This thesis develops a new framework featuring a typology with eight branches of securitisation. The thesis then uses that framework to study HIV/AIDS securitisation in two Asian countries: China and India. The process of HIV/AIDS securitisation in both countries is illustrated chronologically. Following the international HIV/AIDS securitisation obtained in 2000, the study shows that HIV/AIDS has been fully securitised by both national governments since 2004. However, the Chinese government addressed HIV/AIDS through a stand-alone programme, whereas India’s national HIV/AIDS programme was integrated into its primary health care system. Six cities were included in the detailed empirical analysis: Beijing, Shanghai, and Kunming in China, and New Delhi, Mumbai, and Imphal in India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted amongst 62 individuals working in HIV/AIDS-related non-governmental organisations, and 10 officials working in government agencies. Chinese respondents were receptive to framing the threat and handling of HIV/AIDS, yet many grassroots organizations lacked opportunities to participate in the national HIV/AIDS programme. In contrast, such groups were strongly involved in national HIV/AIDS interventions; however, Indian government efforts in fully securitising HIV/AIDS were largely faded out. The thesis therefore responds to the major theoretical and empirical shortcomings identified by security scholars. The thesis also advances the existing knowledge of security studies in general, and HIV/AIDS securitisation processes in the non-Western world in particular.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHumanities and Social Sciences
 
dc.description.thesisleveldoctoral
 
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4832968
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4832968X
 
dc.subject.lcshHuman security - China.
 
dc.subject.lcshHuman security - India.
 
dc.subject.lcshAIDS (Disease) - Social aspects - China.
 
dc.subject.lcshAIDS (Disease) - Social aspects - India.
 
dc.subject.lcshHIV infections - Social aspects - China.
 
dc.subject.lcshHIV infections - Social aspects - India.
 
dc.titleThe securitisation of HIV/AIDS: China and India
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<contributor.author>Lo, Yuk-ping</contributor.author>
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<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;Securitisation theory has made significant contributions to security studies. However, the theory is not without theoretical and empirical shortcomings. Notably, a lack of operationalisation and differentiation has led to a binary classification of results as either &#8216;securitised or not&#8217;. In addition, the presence of Euro-centric assumptions has weakened the theory&#8217;s applicability in non-Western contexts.



This thesis develops a new framework featuring a typology with eight branches of securitisation. The thesis then uses that framework to study HIV/AIDS securitisation in two Asian countries: China and India.



The process of HIV/AIDS securitisation in both countries is illustrated chronologically. Following the international HIV/AIDS securitisation obtained in 2000, the study shows that HIV/AIDS has been fully securitised by both national governments since 2004. However, the Chinese government addressed HIV/AIDS through a stand-alone programme, whereas India&#8217;s national HIV/AIDS programme was integrated into its primary health care system.



Six cities were included in the detailed empirical analysis: Beijing, Shanghai, and Kunming in China, and New Delhi, Mumbai, and Imphal in India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted amongst 62 individuals working in HIV/AIDS-related non-governmental organisations, and 10 officials working in government agencies. Chinese respondents were receptive to framing the threat and handling of HIV/AIDS, yet many grassroots organizations lacked opportunities to participate in the national HIV/AIDS programme. In contrast, such groups were strongly involved in national HIV/AIDS interventions; however, Indian government efforts in fully securitising HIV/AIDS were largely faded out.



The thesis therefore responds to the major theoretical and empirical shortcomings identified by security scholars. The thesis also advances the existing knowledge of security studies in general, and HIV/AIDS securitisation processes in the non-Western world in particular.</description.abstract>
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<subject.lcsh>Human security - China.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Human security - India.</subject.lcsh>
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<subject.lcsh>AIDS (Disease) - Social aspects - India.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>HIV infections - Social aspects - China.</subject.lcsh>
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<title>The securitisation of HIV/AIDS: China and India</title>
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