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Conference Paper: The post always rings twice? The Algerian War, poststructuralism and the postcolonial in IR theory

TitleThe post always rings twice? The Algerian War, poststructuralism and the postcolonial in IR theory
Authors
KeywordsPolitical science
International relations
Issue Date2012
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=RIS
Citation
The Millennium Annual Conference, London School of Economics, London, UK., 16-17 October 2010. In Review of International Studies, 2012, v. 38 n. 1, p. 141-163 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article makes the case for rethinking the relation between poststructuralism and postcolonialism, by building on the claims advanced by Robert Young, Azzedine Haddour and Pal Ahluwalia that the history of deconstruction coincides with the collapse of the French colonial system in Algeria, and with the violent anti-colonial struggle that ensued. I choose to examine narratives of theorists such as Derrida, Lyotard, and Cixous because not only they provide the link between colonial violence, the poststructuralist project that ensued, and postcolonialism, but also because the problems I identify with their projects are replicated by much poststructuralist work in International Relations (IR). I signal that one of the most significant consequences of conducting poststructuralist research without attention to postcolonial horizons lies in the idealisation of the marginalised, the oppressed or the native without attending to the complexity of her position, voice or agency. Bringing these theories together aims to highlight the need for a dialogue, within IR, between poststructuralism's desire to disrupt the disciplinarity of the field, and postcolonialism's potential to transcend the self-referential frame of IR by introducing perspectives, (hi)stories, and voices from elsewhere. © Copyright British International Studies Association 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173571
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.140
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSajed, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:34:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:34:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Millennium Annual Conference, London School of Economics, London, UK., 16-17 October 2010. In Review of International Studies, 2012, v. 38 n. 1, p. 141-163en_US
dc.identifier.issn0260-2105en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173571-
dc.description.abstractThis article makes the case for rethinking the relation between poststructuralism and postcolonialism, by building on the claims advanced by Robert Young, Azzedine Haddour and Pal Ahluwalia that the history of deconstruction coincides with the collapse of the French colonial system in Algeria, and with the violent anti-colonial struggle that ensued. I choose to examine narratives of theorists such as Derrida, Lyotard, and Cixous because not only they provide the link between colonial violence, the poststructuralist project that ensued, and postcolonialism, but also because the problems I identify with their projects are replicated by much poststructuralist work in International Relations (IR). I signal that one of the most significant consequences of conducting poststructuralist research without attention to postcolonial horizons lies in the idealisation of the marginalised, the oppressed or the native without attending to the complexity of her position, voice or agency. Bringing these theories together aims to highlight the need for a dialogue, within IR, between poststructuralism's desire to disrupt the disciplinarity of the field, and postcolonialism's potential to transcend the self-referential frame of IR by introducing perspectives, (hi)stories, and voices from elsewhere. © Copyright British International Studies Association 2010.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=RISen_US
dc.relation.ispartofReview of International Studiesen_US
dc.rightsReview of International Studies. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPolitical science-
dc.subjectInternational relations-
dc.titleThe post always rings twice? The Algerian War, poststructuralism and the postcolonial in IR theoryen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSajed, A: asajed@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySajed, A=rp01426en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0260210510001567en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855861762en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros187816-
dc.identifier.hkuros187874-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84855861762&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage141en_US
dc.identifier.epage163en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299885800008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.description.otherThe Millennium Annual Conference, London School of Economics, London, UK., 16-17 October 2010. In Review of International Studies, 2012, v. 38 n. 1, p. 141-163-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSajed, A=36440346900en_US

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