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Conference Paper: Complications and long-term outcome of living liver donors: A survey of 1,508 cases in five Asian centers

TitleComplications and long-term outcome of living liver donors: A survey of 1,508 cases in five Asian centers
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
Citation
Transplantation, 2003, v. 75 n. 3 SUPPL., p. S12-S15 How to Cite?
AbstractA multicenter survey was conducted regarding the safety and outcome of living liver donors in Asia. Five Asian liver transplant centers reported a total of 1,508 living donor liver transplantations (LDLT) performed between January 1990 and December 2001. The recipients consisted of 766 adults and 742 children. The graft types were left lateral or extended left lateral segment in 605, left lobe in 334, right lobe or right lateral sector in 561, and not classified in eight cases. The donor blood loss was less than 1,000 mL in 94.1% of the cases, and 0.53% of the donors received banked blood transfusion. The overall donor complication rate was 15.8%, and 1.1% of donors underwent reoperation. The complication rate was higher in right lobe (28%) than in left lateral segment (9.3%) or left lobe (7.5%) donors. In particular, right lobe donors had more serious complications such as cholestasis (7.3%), bile leakage (6.1%), biliary stricture (1.1%), portal vein thrombosis (0.5%), intra-abdominal bleeding (0.5%), and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). There was no hospital mortality, but there was one late donor death 3 years after operation. Long-term follow-up beyond 3 months was available in 15.1% of the donors only. The data from the multicenter study set the standard for the safety of living liver donors in high-volume liver transplant centers in Asia and provide further justification for the continued application of LDLT in the face of the critical organ shortage in Asia. The long-term outcome of liver donation, however, remains unknown, and transplant centers should continue their follow-up of donors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173559
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.699
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:32:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:32:57Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 2003, v. 75 n. 3 SUPPL., p. S12-S15en_US
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173559-
dc.description.abstractA multicenter survey was conducted regarding the safety and outcome of living liver donors in Asia. Five Asian liver transplant centers reported a total of 1,508 living donor liver transplantations (LDLT) performed between January 1990 and December 2001. The recipients consisted of 766 adults and 742 children. The graft types were left lateral or extended left lateral segment in 605, left lobe in 334, right lobe or right lateral sector in 561, and not classified in eight cases. The donor blood loss was less than 1,000 mL in 94.1% of the cases, and 0.53% of the donors received banked blood transfusion. The overall donor complication rate was 15.8%, and 1.1% of donors underwent reoperation. The complication rate was higher in right lobe (28%) than in left lateral segment (9.3%) or left lobe (7.5%) donors. In particular, right lobe donors had more serious complications such as cholestasis (7.3%), bile leakage (6.1%), biliary stricture (1.1%), portal vein thrombosis (0.5%), intra-abdominal bleeding (0.5%), and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). There was no hospital mortality, but there was one late donor death 3 years after operation. Long-term follow-up beyond 3 months was available in 15.1% of the donors only. The data from the multicenter study set the standard for the safety of living liver donors in high-volume liver transplant centers in Asia and provide further justification for the continued application of LDLT in the face of the critical organ shortage in Asia. The long-term outcome of liver donation, however, remains unknown, and transplant centers should continue their follow-up of donors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTransplantationen_US
dc.rightsTransplantation. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsiaen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantation - Adverse Effects - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshLiving Donors - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshReoperation - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleComplications and long-term outcome of living liver donors: A survey of 1,508 cases in five Asian centersen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, CM: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, CM=rp00412en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.TP.0000046534.45645.47-
dc.identifier.pmid12589131-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037442204en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros77123-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037442204&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume75en_US
dc.identifier.issue3 SUPPL.en_US
dc.identifier.spageS12en_US
dc.identifier.epageS15en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181167000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CM=7401771672en_US

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