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Conference Paper: Effects of acoustic degradation on syntactic processing: Implications for the nature of the resource system used in language processing

TitleEffects of acoustic degradation on syntactic processing: Implications for the nature of the resource system used in language processing
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&c
Citation
Brain And Cognition, 2002, v. 48 n. 2-3, p. 617-625 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated the effect of noise masking on on-line syntactic processing. Ninety college students were tested on measures of working memory and on-line sentence comprehension. Subjects were divided equally into three listening conditions: no noise masking, -3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (S:N), -4.5 dB S:N. The auditory moving windows (AMW) paradigm was used to measure on-line sentence processing. In the AMW paradigm, subjects pressed a button for the successive presentation of each phrase in two types of sentences (syntactically simple and complex), and listening times were recorded for each phrase. Previous studies have shown that the verb in the more complex sentence type is the most capacity demanding portion of the sentence. Listening times were longer overall with increased noise masking, and listening times were longer overall at the verb of the harder sentence type. However, the increase at the verb was not larger with increased noise masking. All three groups showed similar effects of syntactic structure in the on-line data. The on-line syntactic effects were not due to problems in word recognition. Correlational analyses did not indicate a relationship between the increase in processing time at the capacity demanding region of the harder sentence types and any of the measures of working memory capacity in any of the three listening conditions. Results indicate that on-line sentence processing is not affected by noise masking if lexical access (e.g., word recognition) remains intact. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173387
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.399
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.511
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYampolsky, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorCaplan, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthies, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:30:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:30:44Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationBrain And Cognition, 2002, v. 48 n. 2-3, p. 617-625en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-2626en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173387-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the effect of noise masking on on-line syntactic processing. Ninety college students were tested on measures of working memory and on-line sentence comprehension. Subjects were divided equally into three listening conditions: no noise masking, -3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (S:N), -4.5 dB S:N. The auditory moving windows (AMW) paradigm was used to measure on-line sentence processing. In the AMW paradigm, subjects pressed a button for the successive presentation of each phrase in two types of sentences (syntactically simple and complex), and listening times were recorded for each phrase. Previous studies have shown that the verb in the more complex sentence type is the most capacity demanding portion of the sentence. Listening times were longer overall with increased noise masking, and listening times were longer overall at the verb of the harder sentence type. However, the increase at the verb was not larger with increased noise masking. All three groups showed similar effects of syntactic structure in the on-line data. The on-line syntactic effects were not due to problems in word recognition. Correlational analyses did not indicate a relationship between the increase in processing time at the capacity demanding region of the harder sentence types and any of the measures of working memory capacity in any of the three listening conditions. Results indicate that on-line sentence processing is not affected by noise masking if lexical access (e.g., word recognition) remains intact. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&cen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Cognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshMemory - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNoise - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech Acousticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech Perceptionen_US
dc.titleEffects of acoustic degradation on syntactic processing: Implications for the nature of the resource system used in language processingen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChiu, P:pkychiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, P=rp00379en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12030518-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036208812en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036208812&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume48en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-3en_US
dc.identifier.spage617en_US
dc.identifier.epage625en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYampolsky, S=6506997177en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWaters, G=7006745155en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCaplan, D=7103250302en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMatthies, M=7006850732en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, P=7202988127en_US

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