File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Preterm discordant twins: What birth weight difference is significant?

TitlePreterm discordant twins: What birth weight difference is significant?
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajog
Citation
American Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynecology, 1995, v. 172 n. 3, p. 955-959 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of discordant fetal growth on subsequent perinatal and neonatal outcome for different degrees of birth weight discordance in preterm twin gestations. Study design: One hundred twenty-two live born twin sets delivered between 25 and 34 completed weeks' gestation were retrospectively studied. They were stratified into five categories according to the percent difference in infant birth weight: < 10%, 10% to 15%, 15% to 20%, 20% to 30%, and > 30%, which was defined as ([Birth weight of larger twin - Birth weight of smaller twin]/Birth weight of larger twin) x 100. The relationship between different birth weight categories and the perinatal and neonatal outcome and the difference in outcome between the large and small infants within each category were determined. Results: Preterm twin gestations with > 30% birth weight discordance were associated with a higher incidence of infant death (25%), congenital anomalies (37.5%), small-for-gestational-age infants (31.8%), Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes (33.3%), and periventricular leukomalacia (16.7%), in spite of a higher cesarean delivery rate (79.2%). Outcomes of large and small infants within categories were similar except in the > 30% group, where all deaths occurred in the small infants. Conclusion: In preterm twin gestations the use of a 30% birth weight difference to define twin discordance is most clinically relevant in identifying those infants at risk for adverse perinatal outcome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173211
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.681
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.255
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, VYTen_US
dc.contributor.authorBocking, ADen_US
dc.contributor.authorDasilva, OPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:28:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:28:33Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynecology, 1995, v. 172 n. 3, p. 955-959en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9378en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173211-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of discordant fetal growth on subsequent perinatal and neonatal outcome for different degrees of birth weight discordance in preterm twin gestations. Study design: One hundred twenty-two live born twin sets delivered between 25 and 34 completed weeks' gestation were retrospectively studied. They were stratified into five categories according to the percent difference in infant birth weight: < 10%, 10% to 15%, 15% to 20%, 20% to 30%, and > 30%, which was defined as ([Birth weight of larger twin - Birth weight of smaller twin]/Birth weight of larger twin) x 100. The relationship between different birth weight categories and the perinatal and neonatal outcome and the difference in outcome between the large and small infants within each category were determined. Results: Preterm twin gestations with > 30% birth weight discordance were associated with a higher incidence of infant death (25%), congenital anomalies (37.5%), small-for-gestational-age infants (31.8%), Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes (33.3%), and periventricular leukomalacia (16.7%), in spite of a higher cesarean delivery rate (79.2%). Outcomes of large and small infants within categories were similar except in the > 30% group, where all deaths occurred in the small infants. Conclusion: In preterm twin gestations the use of a 30% birth weight difference to define twin discordance is most clinically relevant in identifying those infants at risk for adverse perinatal outcome.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajogen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten_US
dc.subject.meshDiseases In Twins - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic And Fetal Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Prematureen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshTwinsen_US
dc.titlePreterm discordant twins: What birth weight difference is significant?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, VYT:vytc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, VYT=rp01323en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0002-9378(95)90027-6en_US
dc.identifier.pmid7892890-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028951930en_US
dc.identifier.volume172en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage955en_US
dc.identifier.epage959en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QM79500027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, VYT=7005439023en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBocking, AD=35517041400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDasilva, OP=6603034552en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats