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Article: Previous abdominal operations do not affect the outcomes of laparoscopic colorectal surgery

TitlePrevious abdominal operations do not affect the outcomes of laparoscopic colorectal surgery
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2005, v. 19 n. 3, p. 326-330 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Previous abdominal surgery has been regarded as a relative contraindication for laparoscopic surgery. However, studies on laparoscopic cholecystectomy have showed that the presence of prior abdominal procedures does not affect the outcomes of surgery. This study aimed to investigate the impact of previous abdominal surgery on laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods: This study enrolled 295 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery from May 2000 to May 2003. The patients were divided into two groups: those with previous abdominal surgery (n = 84) and those without a prior operation (n = 211). The outcomes of surgery for the two groups were compared with respect to the duration of surgery, blood loss, conversion rate, time to return of bowel function, resumption of diet, complications, and the hospital stay. Results: The study included 158 men and 137 women. The median age of the patients was 70 years (range, 33-91 years). Significantly more female patients and patients with benign diseases had prior abdominal surgery. Conversion was required for 17.8% of the patients with and 11.4% of the patients without previous surgery (p = 0.181). There were no differences in the operating time or blood loss between the two groups. The time to bowel movement and resumption of diet were similar in the two groups. The median hospital stay was 7 days for both groups. Of the 39 conversions, 28.2% were necessitated mainly by the presence of adhesions. In the patients who underwent conversion because of adhesions (n = 11), nine had prior surgery and two did not (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The presence of prior surgery does not affect the operating time or blood loss of patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The conversion rate is not increased for patients with prior surgery. The postoperative outcomes in terms of ileus, complication rate, and hospital stay are not worse for patients with prior surgery. Previous abdominal surgery should not be considered as a contraindication for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172877
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, YMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, KWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:25:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:25:29Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2005, v. 19 n. 3, p. 326-330en_US
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172877-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous abdominal surgery has been regarded as a relative contraindication for laparoscopic surgery. However, studies on laparoscopic cholecystectomy have showed that the presence of prior abdominal procedures does not affect the outcomes of surgery. This study aimed to investigate the impact of previous abdominal surgery on laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods: This study enrolled 295 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery from May 2000 to May 2003. The patients were divided into two groups: those with previous abdominal surgery (n = 84) and those without a prior operation (n = 211). The outcomes of surgery for the two groups were compared with respect to the duration of surgery, blood loss, conversion rate, time to return of bowel function, resumption of diet, complications, and the hospital stay. Results: The study included 158 men and 137 women. The median age of the patients was 70 years (range, 33-91 years). Significantly more female patients and patients with benign diseases had prior abdominal surgery. Conversion was required for 17.8% of the patients with and 11.4% of the patients without previous surgery (p = 0.181). There were no differences in the operating time or blood loss between the two groups. The time to bowel movement and resumption of diet were similar in the two groups. The median hospital stay was 7 days for both groups. Of the 39 conversions, 28.2% were necessitated mainly by the presence of adhesions. In the patients who underwent conversion because of adhesions (n = 11), nine had prior surgery and two did not (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The presence of prior surgery does not affect the operating time or blood loss of patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The conversion rate is not increased for patients with prior surgery. The postoperative outcomes in terms of ileus, complication rate, and hospital stay are not worse for patients with prior surgery. Previous abdominal surgery should not be considered as a contraindication for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshAbdomen - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshColonic Diseases - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshDigestive System Surgical Proceduresen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy - Contraindicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRectal Diseases - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titlePrevious abdominal operations do not affect the outcomes of laparoscopic colorectal surgeryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WL: lawwl@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, WL=rp00436en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-004-8114-8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15624064-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21244461603en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-21244461603&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage326en_US
dc.identifier.epage330en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229017300006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, WL=7103147867en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, YM=8521465600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, KW=7402453653en_US

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