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Article: Quantitative Analysis and Prognostic Implication of SARS Coronavirus RNA in the Plasma and Serum of Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

TitleQuantitative Analysis and Prognostic Implication of SARS Coronavirus RNA in the Plasma and Serum of Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinchem.org
Citation
Clinical Chemistry, 2003, v. 49 n. 12, p. 1976-1980 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The availability of an early diagnostic tool for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) would have major public health implications. We investigated whether the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) can be detected in serum and plasma samples during the early stages of SARS and studied the potential prognostic implications of such an approach. Methods: We developed two real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays, one for the polymerase and the other for the nucleocapsid region of the virus genome, for measuring the concentration of SARS-CoV RNA in serum/plasma samples from SARS patients. Plasma samples were obtained from 12 confirmed SARS patients on the day of hospital admission, as well as on days 7 and 14 after fever onset. Serum samples were also obtained from 23 confirmed SARS patients on the day of hospital admission, 11 of whom subsequently required intensive care. Viral RNA was extracted from the plasma/serum samples. The extracted RNA was subjected to analysis by the RT-PCR assays. Results: The RT-PCR system for the polymerase region detected SARS-CoV RNA in 50% of plasma and 78% of serum samples from SARS patients during the first week of illness. The detection rates for plasma dropped to 25% at day 14 after fever onset. The median serum SARS-CoV concentrations in patients who required and did not require intensive care unit admission during the course of hospitalization were 5800 and 140 copies/mL, respectively (Mann-Whitney test, P <0.005). These data were confirmed by the RT-PCR system for the nucleocapsid region, which showed an even higher detection rate of 87%. The correlation between the results obtained by the two RT-PCR systems was high (Pearson correlation analysis, r = 0.998; P <0.001). Conclusion: Plasma/serum SARS-CoV quantification represents a potentially useful early diagnostic and prognostic tool for SARS. © 2003 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172846
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.457
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.472
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, EKOen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, DSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHung, ECWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, RWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChim, SSCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSung, JJYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, JSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, YMDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:25:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Chemistry, 2003, v. 49 n. 12, p. 1976-1980en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-9147en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172846-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The availability of an early diagnostic tool for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) would have major public health implications. We investigated whether the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) can be detected in serum and plasma samples during the early stages of SARS and studied the potential prognostic implications of such an approach. Methods: We developed two real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays, one for the polymerase and the other for the nucleocapsid region of the virus genome, for measuring the concentration of SARS-CoV RNA in serum/plasma samples from SARS patients. Plasma samples were obtained from 12 confirmed SARS patients on the day of hospital admission, as well as on days 7 and 14 after fever onset. Serum samples were also obtained from 23 confirmed SARS patients on the day of hospital admission, 11 of whom subsequently required intensive care. Viral RNA was extracted from the plasma/serum samples. The extracted RNA was subjected to analysis by the RT-PCR assays. Results: The RT-PCR system for the polymerase region detected SARS-CoV RNA in 50% of plasma and 78% of serum samples from SARS patients during the first week of illness. The detection rates for plasma dropped to 25% at day 14 after fever onset. The median serum SARS-CoV concentrations in patients who required and did not require intensive care unit admission during the course of hospitalization were 5800 and 140 copies/mL, respectively (Mann-Whitney test, P <0.005). These data were confirmed by the RT-PCR system for the nucleocapsid region, which showed an even higher detection rate of 87%. The correlation between the results obtained by the two RT-PCR systems was high (Pearson correlation analysis, r = 0.998; P <0.001). Conclusion: Plasma/serum SARS-CoV quantification represents a potentially useful early diagnostic and prognostic tool for SARS. © 2003 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinchem.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virus - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Diagnosisen_US
dc.titleQuantitative Analysis and Prognostic Implication of SARS Coronavirus RNA in the Plasma and Serum of Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndromeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, EKO: ngko@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, EKO=rp01364en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1373/clinchem.2003.024125en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14633867-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0345411820en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0345411820&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume49en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1976en_US
dc.identifier.epage1980en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186741800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EKO=21135553700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, DS=7101862411en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KCA=13403797200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, ECW=7004256338en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, RWK=7103038413en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, N=7402722286en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, A=7402998681en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChim, SSC=6701728226en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, YK=7202614141en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSung, JJY=24473715000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, JS=24788939600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, YMD=7401935391en_US

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