File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Carotid stenosis after radio therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

TitleCarotid stenosis after radio therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archoto.com
Citation
Archives Of Otolaryngology - Head And Neck Surgery, 2000, v. 126 n. 4, p. 517-521 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for radiation- induced carotid stenosis in patients with malignant neoplasms of the head and neck. Design: Prospective cross-sectional screening of extracranial carotid stenosis by color-flow duplex ultrasonography with an analysis of demographic and comorbid risk factors. Setting: Tertiary oncology and vascular referral center. Patients: The study included 96 consecutive patients (75 men and 21 women; mean age, 53.6 years) who had undergone cervical radiotherapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma more than 12 months ago. The mean post-RT interval was 79.9 months. Fourteen patients had cerebrovascular symptoms. A group of 96 healthy individuals were used as controls. Main Outcome Measures: Internal carotid stenosis and common carotid artery stenosis were classified by duplex ultrasonography into moderate (30%-69%), severe (70%-99%), and totally occlusive. Results: Internal carotid artery stenosis of 70% or more was detected in 14 arteries in 12 patients (6 occlusions). Common carotid artery stenosis of 70% or more was found in 11 arteries in 9 patients (4 occlusions). Overall, 15 patients (16%) had critical stenosis in their common or internal carotid arteries, and another 20 (21%) had stenosis in the moderate range. Critical carotid stenosis was not present in any of the control subjects. Severe post-RT carotid stenosis was associated with age (P = .003), smoking (P = .004), heart disease (P < .001), no prior oncological surgery (P < .001), cerebrovascular symptoms (P < .001), and interval from RI (P < .001). Smoking, interval from RT, cerebrovascular symptoms, and no head and neck surgery were significant independent predictors for severe carotid stenosis on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Patients who undergo irradiation of the head and neck for more than 5 years have a higher risk of developing significant carotid stenosis (relative risk, 15), and routine duplex ultrasound screening is recommended.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172765
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.327
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTing, ACWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, LKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:24:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:24:48Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Otolaryngology - Head And Neck Surgery, 2000, v. 126 n. 4, p. 517-521en_US
dc.identifier.issn0886-4470en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172765-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for radiation- induced carotid stenosis in patients with malignant neoplasms of the head and neck. Design: Prospective cross-sectional screening of extracranial carotid stenosis by color-flow duplex ultrasonography with an analysis of demographic and comorbid risk factors. Setting: Tertiary oncology and vascular referral center. Patients: The study included 96 consecutive patients (75 men and 21 women; mean age, 53.6 years) who had undergone cervical radiotherapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma more than 12 months ago. The mean post-RT interval was 79.9 months. Fourteen patients had cerebrovascular symptoms. A group of 96 healthy individuals were used as controls. Main Outcome Measures: Internal carotid stenosis and common carotid artery stenosis were classified by duplex ultrasonography into moderate (30%-69%), severe (70%-99%), and totally occlusive. Results: Internal carotid artery stenosis of 70% or more was detected in 14 arteries in 12 patients (6 occlusions). Common carotid artery stenosis of 70% or more was found in 11 arteries in 9 patients (4 occlusions). Overall, 15 patients (16%) had critical stenosis in their common or internal carotid arteries, and another 20 (21%) had stenosis in the moderate range. Critical carotid stenosis was not present in any of the control subjects. Severe post-RT carotid stenosis was associated with age (P = .003), smoking (P = .004), heart disease (P < .001), no prior oncological surgery (P < .001), cerebrovascular symptoms (P < .001), and interval from RI (P < .001). Smoking, interval from RT, cerebrovascular symptoms, and no head and neck surgery were significant independent predictors for severe carotid stenosis on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Patients who undergo irradiation of the head and neck for more than 5 years have a higher risk of developing significant carotid stenosis (relative risk, 15), and routine duplex ultrasound screening is recommended.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archoto.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshCarotid Artery, Commonen_US
dc.subject.meshCarotid Artery, Internalen_US
dc.subject.meshCarotid Stenosis - Epidemiology - Etiology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - Radiotherapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography, Doppler, Coloren_US
dc.titleCarotid stenosis after radio therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinomaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, SWK: wkcheng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, SWK=rp00374en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archotol.126.4.517-
dc.identifier.pmid10772307-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033624883en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033624883&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume126en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage517en_US
dc.identifier.epage521en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000086413700010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, SWK=7404684779en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTing, ACW=7102858552en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, LK=36933271100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats