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Article: Growth hormone therapy transiently increases apolipoprotein(a) in short β-thalassaemia major children with normal growth hormone reserve

TitleGrowth hormone therapy transiently increases apolipoprotein(a) in short β-thalassaemia major children with normal growth hormone reserve
Authors
Keywordsβ-thalassemia major
apo(a) isoforms
apoliprotein(a)
growth hormone therapy
lipoproteins
Issue Date1997
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atherosclerosis
Citation
Atherosclerosis, 1997, v. 128 n. 2, p. 175-182 How to Cite?
AbstractRecombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is now available for treatment of short stature due to growth hormone (GH) deficiency. It's potential use in other causes of short stature raises concerns about adverse effects of long term treatment on carbohydrate and lipoprotein metabolism. We describe the serial changes in lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins, including apo(a) in 12 children with β-thalassaemia major undergoing rhGH treatment for 24-36 months. All showed satisfactory increases in height and weight. A significantly higher mean plasma apo(a) was observed at 3 months (102.6 U/l) versus baseline (71.4 U/l, P < 0.01, geometric means). Subsequently apo(a) levels gradually decreased returning to pretreatment levels after 36 months of rhGH treatment. There were parallel rises and falls in the apo(a) isoforms of different sizes during treatment. There were only minimal changes in the other lipid related parameters. All children had markedly reduced cholesterol levels (3.0 + 0.49 mmol/l, mean ± S.D.) characteristic of their underlying disease. In conclusion the elevation of apo(a) by GH is only transient, there is no differential effect of rhGH on the large and small isoforms of apo(a) and there are no clinically significant adverse effects of rhGH treatment on lipoprotein metabolism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172735
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.942
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.819
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, SCFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPang, RWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwan, EYWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:24:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:24:34Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAtherosclerosis, 1997, v. 128 n. 2, p. 175-182en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9150en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172735-
dc.description.abstractRecombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is now available for treatment of short stature due to growth hormone (GH) deficiency. It's potential use in other causes of short stature raises concerns about adverse effects of long term treatment on carbohydrate and lipoprotein metabolism. We describe the serial changes in lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins, including apo(a) in 12 children with β-thalassaemia major undergoing rhGH treatment for 24-36 months. All showed satisfactory increases in height and weight. A significantly higher mean plasma apo(a) was observed at 3 months (102.6 U/l) versus baseline (71.4 U/l, P < 0.01, geometric means). Subsequently apo(a) levels gradually decreased returning to pretreatment levels after 36 months of rhGH treatment. There were parallel rises and falls in the apo(a) isoforms of different sizes during treatment. There were only minimal changes in the other lipid related parameters. All children had markedly reduced cholesterol levels (3.0 + 0.49 mmol/l, mean ± S.D.) characteristic of their underlying disease. In conclusion the elevation of apo(a) by GH is only transient, there is no differential effect of rhGH on the large and small isoforms of apo(a) and there are no clinically significant adverse effects of rhGH treatment on lipoprotein metabolism.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atherosclerosisen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAtherosclerosisen_HK
dc.rightsAtherosclerosis. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.-
dc.subjectβ-thalassemia majoren_HK
dc.subjectapo(a) isoformsen_HK
dc.subjectapoliprotein(a)en_HK
dc.subjectgrowth hormone therapyen_HK
dc.subjectlipoproteinsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAllelesen_US
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins A - Blood - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone - Metabolism - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshRecombinant Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshBeta-Thalassemia - Genetics - Metabolism - Pathologyen_US
dc.titleGrowth hormone therapy transiently increases apolipoprotein(a) in short β-thalassaemia major children with normal growth hormone reserveen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPang, RWC: robertap@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPang, RWC=rp00274en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0021-9150(96)06001-7en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9050774-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031059053en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros21827-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031059053&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume128en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage175en_HK
dc.identifier.epage182en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997WX81200006-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, SCF=7202037323en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, RWC=7004376659en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwan, EYW=7006484387en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, LCK=7007049461en_HK

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