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Article: Reinventing the self under socialism: migrant male sex workers ('money boys') in China

TitleReinventing the self under socialism: migrant male sex workers ('money boys') in China
Authors
KeywordsCapitalism
Homosexuality
Migrant worker
Migration
Prostitution
Issue Date2012
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14672715.asp
Citation
Critical Asian Studies, 2012, v. 44 n. 2, p. 283-308 How to Cite?
AbstractAs part of a massive rural-to-urban migrant population in post-Mao reform era China, rural male migrants in their early twenties are increasingly entering the sex industry, which offers same-sex sexual services to other men. These young men, known as 'money boys,' form a new urban subject. From continuous ethnographic research on the male sex industry in China since 2004, the author argues that this new urban subject represents the site of multiple contradictions in China's continual transformations, which are at once authoritarian and neoliberal. The neoliberal reconfiguration, such as development strategies, commercialization of bodies, and liberalization of identities, opens up new social and sexual spaces and nurtures in thema new enterprising and desiring ethics of the self. However, their pursuit of needs, wants, and desires for work, love, and sex remains constricted by authoritarian codes such as the hukou system, antiprostitution measures, and the stratified cosmopolitan tongzhi community. Money boys are new urban subjects, but city outcasts; they are new labor subjects, but illegal dagongzai; they are new queer subjects, but 'improper' tongzhi. Using the narratives of three money boys, the author argues that they, though endorsing neoliberal 'ways of doing things' to create viable spaces for survival, do not embrace neoliberal political projects that tend to reinforce the hierarchical structure of urban-rural divisions, legal/illegal labor relationships, and illicit/licit desires. This article contributes to studies of migration, prostitution, and homosexuality in China, as well as to an understanding of the relationship between capitalism, state governance, and subjectivity in post-socialist China. © 2012 Copyright BCAS, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172361
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.433
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.301
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKong, TSKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationCritical Asian Studies, 2012, v. 44 n. 2, p. 283-308en_US
dc.identifier.issn1467-2715en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172361-
dc.description.abstractAs part of a massive rural-to-urban migrant population in post-Mao reform era China, rural male migrants in their early twenties are increasingly entering the sex industry, which offers same-sex sexual services to other men. These young men, known as 'money boys,' form a new urban subject. From continuous ethnographic research on the male sex industry in China since 2004, the author argues that this new urban subject represents the site of multiple contradictions in China's continual transformations, which are at once authoritarian and neoliberal. The neoliberal reconfiguration, such as development strategies, commercialization of bodies, and liberalization of identities, opens up new social and sexual spaces and nurtures in thema new enterprising and desiring ethics of the self. However, their pursuit of needs, wants, and desires for work, love, and sex remains constricted by authoritarian codes such as the hukou system, antiprostitution measures, and the stratified cosmopolitan tongzhi community. Money boys are new urban subjects, but city outcasts; they are new labor subjects, but illegal dagongzai; they are new queer subjects, but 'improper' tongzhi. Using the narratives of three money boys, the author argues that they, though endorsing neoliberal 'ways of doing things' to create viable spaces for survival, do not embrace neoliberal political projects that tend to reinforce the hierarchical structure of urban-rural divisions, legal/illegal labor relationships, and illicit/licit desires. This article contributes to studies of migration, prostitution, and homosexuality in China, as well as to an understanding of the relationship between capitalism, state governance, and subjectivity in post-socialist China. © 2012 Copyright BCAS, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14672715.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Asian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectCapitalism-
dc.subjectHomosexuality-
dc.subjectMigrant worker-
dc.subjectMigration-
dc.subjectProstitution-
dc.titleReinventing the self under socialism: migrant male sex workers ('money boys') in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKong, TSK: travisk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKong, TSK=rp00557en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14672715.2012.672829en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861318071en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207792-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861318071&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage283en_US
dc.identifier.epage308en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6033-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303612900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKong, TSK=12809625200en_US

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