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Article: Moral panics, crime rates and harsh punishment in China

TitleMoral panics, crime rates and harsh punishment in China
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAustralian Academic Press Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/Publications/Journals/Criminology/Criminology.htm
Citation
Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Criminology, 2004, v. 37 no. 1, suppl., p. 67-89 How to Cite?
AbstractToday's extremely harsh sentencing regime in China, which includes extensive use of the death penalty, was triggered in particular by a moral panic about juvenile crime and to some extent economic crime in the early 1980s. The policy was justified by the belief that China was experiencing an extreme upsurge in crime. A critical look at Chinese crime rates over the last 25 years does not support this belief, however. Chinese reactions against crime instead have to be seen in terms of the regime's legitimacy and alleged defence of the social and moral order in a society undergoing rapid change.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172341
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.696
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.352
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBakken, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralian And New Zealand Journal Of Criminology, 2004, v. 37 no. 1, suppl., p. 67-89en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-8658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172341-
dc.description.abstractToday's extremely harsh sentencing regime in China, which includes extensive use of the death penalty, was triggered in particular by a moral panic about juvenile crime and to some extent economic crime in the early 1980s. The policy was justified by the belief that China was experiencing an extreme upsurge in crime. A critical look at Chinese crime rates over the last 25 years does not support this belief, however. Chinese reactions against crime instead have to be seen in terms of the regime's legitimacy and alleged defence of the social and moral order in a society undergoing rapid change.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Academic Press Pty Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/Publications/Journals/Criminology/Criminology.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.titleMoral panics, crime rates and harsh punishment in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBakken, B: bakken@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBakken, B=rp00616en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/00048658040370S105-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-14544274478en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-14544274478&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issueno. 1, suppl.en_US
dc.identifier.spage67en_US
dc.identifier.epage89en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBakken, B=6603543706en_US

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