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Article: Le qigong et la tradition sectaire chinoise

TitleLe qigong et la tradition sectaire chinoise
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105777
Citation
Social Compass, 2003, v. 50 n. 4, p. 471-480 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the 1980s and 1990s, Qigong or "breathing arts" became the most wide-spread form of popular religiosity in Chinese cities. Thousands of charismatic Qigong masters appeared, promoting Qigong methods through transmission networks covering the whole country. Falungong became the biggest Qigong group by the mid-1990s. The author examines the hypothesis of links between Qigong and a galaxy of groups which were widespread in pre-Communist China, often called "sectarian" in the academic literature and also known as "White Lotus" sects. By comparing the ideology, the practices and the structure of these groups, it is possible to conclude that Qigong is a modern expression of the Chinese tradition of popular sectarianism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172340
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.172
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.139
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, DAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Compass, 2003, v. 50 n. 4, p. 471-480en_US
dc.identifier.issn0037-7686en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172340-
dc.description.abstractDuring the 1980s and 1990s, Qigong or "breathing arts" became the most wide-spread form of popular religiosity in Chinese cities. Thousands of charismatic Qigong masters appeared, promoting Qigong methods through transmission networks covering the whole country. Falungong became the biggest Qigong group by the mid-1990s. The author examines the hypothesis of links between Qigong and a galaxy of groups which were widespread in pre-Communist China, often called "sectarian" in the academic literature and also known as "White Lotus" sects. By comparing the ideology, the practices and the structure of these groups, it is possible to conclude that Qigong is a modern expression of the Chinese tradition of popular sectarianism.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105777en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Compassen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleLe qigong et la tradition sectaire chinoiseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPalmer, DA: palmer19@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPalmer, DA=rp00654en_US
dc.description.naturepostprinten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0037768603504006en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0348207916en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0348207916&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage471en_US
dc.identifier.epage480en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000187607200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPalmer, DA=27968016800en_US

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