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Article: Depression literacy among Chinese in Shanghai, China: A comparison with Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne and Chinese in Hong Kong

TitleDepression literacy among Chinese in Shanghai, China: A comparison with Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne and Chinese in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Chinese Culture
Depression
Mental Health Literacy
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127
Citation
Social Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2012, v. 47 n. 8, p. 1235-1242 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The study reported in this paper was aimed at developing understanding of depression-related knowledge and preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods among Chinese living in Shanghai, China. Methods: A multi-stage cluster sampling method in which participants were taken from 6 of the 20 districts in Shanghai was adopted for this study. The 522 Shanghai Chinese participants were presented with a vignette describing an individual with depression before being asked questions designed to assess both their understanding of depression and their preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods. A comparative approach was adopted to identify similarities and differences between our findings and those of two previous studies on the mental health literacy of Chinese living in Melbourne, Australia, and Hong Kong, respectively. Results: A similarly low percentage of Chinese people in each of Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Australia recognized depression. Fewer Shanghai Chinese than Chinese living in Hong Kong and Australia ascribed the 'anxiety/stress' label to the depression vignette and endorsed professionals and informal network members as helpful. Although a far lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed the use of counseling professionals, a much higher percentage of the same group endorsed Chinese medical doctors and herbal medication. A lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed 'lifestyle changes' as a strategy for combating depression than did Chinese subjects living in Australia and Hong Kong. On the other hand, a higher percentage of Shanghai residents endorsed psychiatric treatment and the traditional Chinese practices of 'eating nutritious food/taking supplements' and 'qigong' than among the other two groups of Chinese. Conclusions: This study underlines the need for campaigns aimed at improving the mental health literacy of Chinese in Shanghai. Such campaigns must take into consideration the socially and culturally driven beliefs to facilitate the development of specific education programs. © Springer-Verlag 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172317
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.513
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorXuesong, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, AYKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2012, v. 47 n. 8, p. 1235-1242en_US
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172317-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The study reported in this paper was aimed at developing understanding of depression-related knowledge and preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods among Chinese living in Shanghai, China. Methods: A multi-stage cluster sampling method in which participants were taken from 6 of the 20 districts in Shanghai was adopted for this study. The 522 Shanghai Chinese participants were presented with a vignette describing an individual with depression before being asked questions designed to assess both their understanding of depression and their preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods. A comparative approach was adopted to identify similarities and differences between our findings and those of two previous studies on the mental health literacy of Chinese living in Melbourne, Australia, and Hong Kong, respectively. Results: A similarly low percentage of Chinese people in each of Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Australia recognized depression. Fewer Shanghai Chinese than Chinese living in Hong Kong and Australia ascribed the 'anxiety/stress' label to the depression vignette and endorsed professionals and informal network members as helpful. Although a far lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed the use of counseling professionals, a much higher percentage of the same group endorsed Chinese medical doctors and herbal medication. A lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed 'lifestyle changes' as a strategy for combating depression than did Chinese subjects living in Australia and Hong Kong. On the other hand, a higher percentage of Shanghai residents endorsed psychiatric treatment and the traditional Chinese practices of 'eating nutritious food/taking supplements' and 'qigong' than among the other two groups of Chinese. Conclusions: This study underlines the need for campaigns aimed at improving the mental health literacy of Chinese in Shanghai. Such campaigns must take into consideration the socially and culturally driven beliefs to facilitate the development of specific education programs. © Springer-Verlag 2011.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectChineseen_US
dc.subjectChinese Cultureen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectMental Health Literacyen_US
dc.titleDepression literacy among Chinese in Shanghai, China: A comparison with Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne and Chinese in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-011-0430-4en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21901401-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864916685en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros256230-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84864916685&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume47en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage1235en_US
dc.identifier.epage1242en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000306546800004-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXuesong, H=49664526400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, A=33068355500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, AYK=42561610400en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9810194-

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