File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The New Zealand gaming and betting survey: Chinese and Indian people's experience

TitleThe New Zealand gaming and betting survey: Chinese and Indian people's experience
Authors
KeywordsBetting
Ethnic Health
Ethnic Minorities
Harm-Minimization
New Zealand
Personal Health
Responsible Gambling
Issue Date2012
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1747-9894
Citation
International Journal Of Migration, Health And Social Care, 2012, v. 8 n. 2, p. 98-106 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose-The purpose of this paper is to analyse attitudes, understanding of gambling and gambling related harm among Asians in New Zealand using secondary data from the New Zealand 2006/07 Gaming and Betting Attitudes Survey (GBAS). Design/methodology/approach-This survey interviewed 1,973 nationwide randomly selected youths and adults ($18 years) using structured questionnaire. Chinese (N = 113) and Indian (N = 122) data were analysed separately to compare between them and with NZ Europeans (N = 792). Descriptive analysis was carried out and was subsequently tested for significant correlations by weighted (p < 0.01) and un-weighted (p < 0.05) variables. Findings-A higher proportion of Chinese males (66.8 percent) represented in the survey compared to Indian (43.0 percent) and NZ European (48.9 percent) where Chinese consisted of more youthful age structure. Chinese respondents were more likely to be in the lowest income bracket (NZ$10,000) compared to others. Among the ten gambling activities "casino table gambling" and "casino electronic machines" (slot-style machine) were most popular among the Chinese where Indians preferred "gambling/casino evening". A significant proportion of Chinese were unwilling to refer family or friends to gambling help services despite believing that gambling does more harm than good. Pre-committed gambling sum was the most common harm minimising strategy suggested by participants. They believed education and consultation could deter youths from harmful gambling. Research limitations/implications-This survey highlighted gambling behaviours and thoughts of the ethnic minority population in New Zealand. Study outcomes would be valuable in formulating ethnic specific preventative programme and may have policy implication. Originality/value-There has been limited research on gambling behaviour of ethnic minorities in New Zealand. This paper fills some of the gaps. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172311
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.261
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorRossen, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoque, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Migration, Health And Social Care, 2012, v. 8 n. 2, p. 98-106en_US
dc.identifier.issn1747-9894en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172311-
dc.description.abstractPurpose-The purpose of this paper is to analyse attitudes, understanding of gambling and gambling related harm among Asians in New Zealand using secondary data from the New Zealand 2006/07 Gaming and Betting Attitudes Survey (GBAS). Design/methodology/approach-This survey interviewed 1,973 nationwide randomly selected youths and adults ($18 years) using structured questionnaire. Chinese (N = 113) and Indian (N = 122) data were analysed separately to compare between them and with NZ Europeans (N = 792). Descriptive analysis was carried out and was subsequently tested for significant correlations by weighted (p < 0.01) and un-weighted (p < 0.05) variables. Findings-A higher proportion of Chinese males (66.8 percent) represented in the survey compared to Indian (43.0 percent) and NZ European (48.9 percent) where Chinese consisted of more youthful age structure. Chinese respondents were more likely to be in the lowest income bracket (NZ$10,000) compared to others. Among the ten gambling activities "casino table gambling" and "casino electronic machines" (slot-style machine) were most popular among the Chinese where Indians preferred "gambling/casino evening". A significant proportion of Chinese were unwilling to refer family or friends to gambling help services despite believing that gambling does more harm than good. Pre-committed gambling sum was the most common harm minimising strategy suggested by participants. They believed education and consultation could deter youths from harmful gambling. Research limitations/implications-This survey highlighted gambling behaviours and thoughts of the ethnic minority population in New Zealand. Study outcomes would be valuable in formulating ethnic specific preventative programme and may have policy implication. Originality/value-There has been limited research on gambling behaviour of ethnic minorities in New Zealand. This paper fills some of the gaps. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1747-9894en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Migration, Health and Social Careen_US
dc.subjectBettingen_US
dc.subjectEthnic Healthen_US
dc.subjectEthnic Minoritiesen_US
dc.subjectHarm-Minimizationen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.subjectPersonal Healthen_US
dc.subjectResponsible Gamblingen_US
dc.titleThe New Zealand gaming and betting survey: Chinese and Indian people's experienceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, S: samsont@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, S=rp00627en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/17479891211250049en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863839502en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros205480-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863839502&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage98en_US
dc.identifier.epage106en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, S=7006643163en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRossen, F=6506701302en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoque, E=6701363305en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats