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Article: A randomized controlled trial of qigong exercise on fatigue symptoms, functioning, and telomerase activity in persons with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome

TitleA randomized controlled trial of qigong exercise on fatigue symptoms, functioning, and telomerase activity in persons with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome
Authors
KeywordsChronicfatigue
Exercise
Qigong
Randomized controlled trial
Telomerase
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 44 n. 2, p. 160-170 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue is common in the general population. Complementary therapies are often used by patients with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome to manage their symptoms. PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the effect of a 4-month qigong intervention program among patients with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome. METHODS: Sixty-four participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a wait list control group. Outcome measures included fatigue symptoms, physical functioning, mental functioning, and telomerase activity. RESULTS: Fatigue symptoms and mental functioning were significantly improved in the qigong group compared to controls. Telomerase activity increased in the qigong group from 0.102 to 0.178 arbitrary units (p < 0.05). The change was statistically significant when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Qigong exercise may be used as an alternative and complementary therapy or rehabilitative program for chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172308
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, BWMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, JSTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 44 n. 2, p. 160-170en_US
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172308-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue is common in the general population. Complementary therapies are often used by patients with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome to manage their symptoms. PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the effect of a 4-month qigong intervention program among patients with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome. METHODS: Sixty-four participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a wait list control group. Outcome measures included fatigue symptoms, physical functioning, mental functioning, and telomerase activity. RESULTS: Fatigue symptoms and mental functioning were significantly improved in the qigong group compared to controls. Telomerase activity increased in the qigong group from 0.102 to 0.178 arbitrary units (p < 0.05). The change was statistically significant when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Qigong exercise may be used as an alternative and complementary therapy or rehabilitative program for chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChronicfatigueen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectQigongen_US
dc.subjectRandomized controlled trialen_US
dc.subjectTelomeraseen_US
dc.titleA randomized controlled trial of qigong exercise on fatigue symptoms, functioning, and telomerase activity in persons with chronic fatigue or chronic fatigue syndromeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, BWM: h0294358@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12160-012-9381-6en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22736201-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3442161-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84866739365en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros211608-
dc.identifier.hkuros212566-
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage160en_US
dc.identifier.epage170en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1532-4796-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308822900006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=55257397900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, JST=55257572500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, LP=55257355100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, BWM=21934562200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, CW=23996190500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JSM=54893588800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10844324-

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