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Article: Familial Effect on Child Poverty in Hong Kong Immigrant Families
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TitleFamilial Effect on Child Poverty in Hong Kong Immigrant Families
 
AuthorsChou, KL1
 
KeywordsAssimilation
Children
Family Structure
Human Capital
Immigration
Poverty
 
Issue Date2013
 
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0303-8300
 
CitationSocial Indicators Research, 2013, v. 113 n. 1, p. 183-195 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-012-0088-7
 
AbstractThis study investigated how family context affect poverty disparities between young children of immigrants from the Mainland China and children of local families whose parents were born in Hong Kong using 2006 bicensus data. 12,609 and 12,753 children of immigrant and local families were included in our data analyses. We find higher child poverty rates in immigrant families than in local families. Moreover, we found that family structure (single-parent vs. 2-parent), assimilation (first vs. second generation children of immigrant families), and parental human capital characteristics are significantly associated with the child poverty risk. Surprisingly, the impact of immigrant status on child poverty rates is stronger in 2-parent households than in single-parent households while child poverty declines associated with increasing assimilation defined by generational status of children are greater in 2-parent immigrant families than the corresponding declines in single-parent immigrant families. The implications of our results in intergenerational poverty are discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
 
ISSN0303-8300
2013 Impact Factor: 1.452
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-012-0088-7
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChou, KL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:16Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:16Z
 
dc.date.issued2013
 
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated how family context affect poverty disparities between young children of immigrants from the Mainland China and children of local families whose parents were born in Hong Kong using 2006 bicensus data. 12,609 and 12,753 children of immigrant and local families were included in our data analyses. We find higher child poverty rates in immigrant families than in local families. Moreover, we found that family structure (single-parent vs. 2-parent), assimilation (first vs. second generation children of immigrant families), and parental human capital characteristics are significantly associated with the child poverty risk. Surprisingly, the impact of immigrant status on child poverty rates is stronger in 2-parent households than in single-parent households while child poverty declines associated with increasing assimilation defined by generational status of children are greater in 2-parent immigrant families than the corresponding declines in single-parent immigrant families. The implications of our results in intergenerational poverty are discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSocial Indicators Research, 2013, v. 113 n. 1, p. 183-195 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-012-0088-7
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10733436
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-012-0088-7
 
dc.identifier.epage195
 
dc.identifier.issn0303-8300
2013 Impact Factor: 1.452
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84879694426
 
dc.identifier.spage183
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172304
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0303-8300
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Indicators Research
 
dc.subjectAssimilation
 
dc.subjectChildren
 
dc.subjectFamily Structure
 
dc.subjectHuman Capital
 
dc.subjectImmigration
 
dc.subjectPoverty
 
dc.titleFamilial Effect on Child Poverty in Hong Kong Immigrant Families
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<subject>Assimilation</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong