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Article: Perceived discrimination and depression among new migrants to Hong Kong: The moderating role of social support and neighborhood collective efficacy
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TitlePerceived discrimination and depression among new migrants to Hong Kong: The moderating role of social support and neighborhood collective efficacy
 
AuthorsChou, KL1
 
KeywordsCollective Efficacy
Depression
Perceived Discrimination
Social Support
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
 
CitationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2012, v. 138 n. 1-2, p. 63-70 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.12.029
 
AbstractBackground: Although it is well known that perceived discrimination is a risk factor contributing to depressive symptoms among immigrants, most previous studies (1) did not distinguish between discrimination based on immigrant status and race and (2) used cross-sectional data. Aims: To address these limitations, the present study examined whether perceived discrimination affects depressive symptomatology in a representative sample of newly arrived immigrants from Mainland China to Hong Kong using longitudinal data over a period of one year. Methods: A representative sample of 347 migrants aged 18 and older were interviewed face to face in 2007 and 2008. The 20-item Center for Epidemiology Studies of Depression (CES-D) scale was used to measure depressive symptoms and a series of sociodemographic questions (age, gender, marital status, education, and personal income), stress due to perceived discrimination, social support, and neighborhood collective efficacy were also included. Results: Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with depressive symptoms one year later, after adjusting for depressive symptoms at baseline assessment, sociodemographic characteristics, social support, and neighborhood collective efficacy. Moreover, both social support and neighborhood collective efficacy moderated the effect of perceived discrimination on depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Perceived discrimination is a common experience for new Mainland immigrants to Hong Kong, and it predicts depressive symptoms. Therefore, interventions that reduce discrimination and strengthen social support and neighborhood collective efficacy should be designed and implemented to improve the mental health of new immigrants in Hong Kong. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0165-0327
2012 Impact Factor: 3.295
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.530
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.12.029
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChou, KL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:11Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:11Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although it is well known that perceived discrimination is a risk factor contributing to depressive symptoms among immigrants, most previous studies (1) did not distinguish between discrimination based on immigrant status and race and (2) used cross-sectional data. Aims: To address these limitations, the present study examined whether perceived discrimination affects depressive symptomatology in a representative sample of newly arrived immigrants from Mainland China to Hong Kong using longitudinal data over a period of one year. Methods: A representative sample of 347 migrants aged 18 and older were interviewed face to face in 2007 and 2008. The 20-item Center for Epidemiology Studies of Depression (CES-D) scale was used to measure depressive symptoms and a series of sociodemographic questions (age, gender, marital status, education, and personal income), stress due to perceived discrimination, social support, and neighborhood collective efficacy were also included. Results: Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with depressive symptoms one year later, after adjusting for depressive symptoms at baseline assessment, sociodemographic characteristics, social support, and neighborhood collective efficacy. Moreover, both social support and neighborhood collective efficacy moderated the effect of perceived discrimination on depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Perceived discrimination is a common experience for new Mainland immigrants to Hong Kong, and it predicts depressive symptoms. Therefore, interventions that reduce discrimination and strengthen social support and neighborhood collective efficacy should be designed and implemented to improve the mental health of new immigrants in Hong Kong. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2012, v. 138 n. 1-2, p. 63-70 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.12.029
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10294829
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2011.12.029
 
dc.identifier.epage70
 
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
2012 Impact Factor: 3.295
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.530
 
dc.identifier.issue1-2
 
dc.identifier.pmid22284018
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858280333
 
dc.identifier.spage63
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172290
 
dc.identifier.volume138
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disorders
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCollective Efficacy
 
dc.subjectDepression
 
dc.subjectPerceived Discrimination
 
dc.subjectSocial Support
 
dc.titlePerceived discrimination and depression among new migrants to Hong Kong: The moderating role of social support and neighborhood collective efficacy
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong