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Article: Acculturative stressors and acculturative strategies as predictors of negative affect among Chinese international students in Australia and Hong Kong: A cross-cultural comparative study

TitleAcculturative stressors and acculturative strategies as predictors of negative affect among Chinese international students in Australia and Hong Kong: A cross-cultural comparative study
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Academic Psychiatry, 2011, v. 35 n. 6, p. 376-381 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: There are few studies comparing cross-cultural adaptation of migrant groups in two different cultural settings. This study compares the level of negative affect and acculturative stressors between Chinese international students in Australia and Mainland Chinese students in Hong Kong. The predictive effects of acculturative stressors and acculturative strategies on negative affect were also compared between the two groups. Method: A total of 606 graduate students were recruited for a cross-sectional survey in Melbourne, and Hong Kong, China. The measurement included the Acculturative Hassles Scale for Chinese Students, Acculturative Strategy Scale, and Chinese Affect Scale. Independent t-tests and hierarchical regression analysis were conducted for data analysis. Results: Chinese international students in Australia were found to encounter more acculturative stressors and experience a higher level of negative affect than their counterparts in Hong Kong. The acculturative stressor of academic work and a marginalization strategy significantly predicted negative affect in both groups. The acculturative stressor of cultural difference predicted negative affect in the Hong Kong sample, and assimilation strategy predicted negative affect in the Australian sample only. Conclusion: It is more difficult for Chinese international students to adapt to a host society with greater cultural distance. Cross-cultural comparative study helps to find out culture-general and culture-specific predictors of acculturation and helps design tailor-made intervention programs for international students across cultures. Copyright © 2011 Academic Psychiatry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172289
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.217
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.492
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPan, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationAcademic Psychiatry, 2011, v. 35 n. 6, p. 376-381en_US
dc.identifier.issn1042-9670en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172289-
dc.description.abstractObjective: There are few studies comparing cross-cultural adaptation of migrant groups in two different cultural settings. This study compares the level of negative affect and acculturative stressors between Chinese international students in Australia and Mainland Chinese students in Hong Kong. The predictive effects of acculturative stressors and acculturative strategies on negative affect were also compared between the two groups. Method: A total of 606 graduate students were recruited for a cross-sectional survey in Melbourne, and Hong Kong, China. The measurement included the Acculturative Hassles Scale for Chinese Students, Acculturative Strategy Scale, and Chinese Affect Scale. Independent t-tests and hierarchical regression analysis were conducted for data analysis. Results: Chinese international students in Australia were found to encounter more acculturative stressors and experience a higher level of negative affect than their counterparts in Hong Kong. The acculturative stressor of academic work and a marginalization strategy significantly predicted negative affect in both groups. The acculturative stressor of cultural difference predicted negative affect in the Hong Kong sample, and assimilation strategy predicted negative affect in the Australian sample only. Conclusion: It is more difficult for Chinese international students to adapt to a host society with greater cultural distance. Cross-cultural comparative study helps to find out culture-general and culture-specific predictors of acculturation and helps design tailor-made intervention programs for international students across cultures. Copyright © 2011 Academic Psychiatry.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAcademic Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleAcculturative stressors and acculturative strategies as predictors of negative affect among Chinese international students in Australia and Hong Kong: A cross-cultural comparative studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ap.35.6.376en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22193735-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857540004en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros256236-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857540004&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage376en_US
dc.identifier.epage381en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPan, JY=18635196200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US

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