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Article: The association between social isolation and DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders: Wave 2 of the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions

TitleThe association between social isolation and DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders: Wave 2 of the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011, v. 72 n. 11, p. 1468-1476 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The objective of this study is to document the prevalence of social isolation from close friends and religious group members and to test the association of having infrequently contacted close friends and members of religious groups with the current DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Method: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on a cross-sectional, population-based study conducted in 2004-2005 that consists of a nationally representative sample of 34,653 American community-dwelling adults aged 18 years and older. Mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version. Due to missing values for social network characteristics, we focused on 33,368 subjects in this study. Results: We found that many Americans lacked frequently contacted close friends (10.1%; 95% CI, 9.6%-10.6%) or religious group members (58.7%; 95% CI, 57.5%-59.9%) in their social network. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, lifetime diagnosis of the disorder in question, and social isolation in terms of 10 other social ties, we found that the absence of close friends was associated (P < .01) with an increased risk of major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder; the absence of frequently contacted religious group members in a network was positively related (P < .01) to alcohol abuse and dependence, drug abuse, and nicotine dependence. Conclusions: These results suggest that social isolation is common in the United States and is associated with a higher risk of mental health problems. Results provide valuable information for prevention and treatment. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172275
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 5.498
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.852
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorSareen, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011, v. 72 n. 11, p. 1468-1476en_US
dc.identifier.issn0160-6689en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172275-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The objective of this study is to document the prevalence of social isolation from close friends and religious group members and to test the association of having infrequently contacted close friends and members of religious groups with the current DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Method: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on a cross-sectional, population-based study conducted in 2004-2005 that consists of a nationally representative sample of 34,653 American community-dwelling adults aged 18 years and older. Mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version. Due to missing values for social network characteristics, we focused on 33,368 subjects in this study. Results: We found that many Americans lacked frequently contacted close friends (10.1%; 95% CI, 9.6%-10.6%) or religious group members (58.7%; 95% CI, 57.5%-59.9%) in their social network. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, lifetime diagnosis of the disorder in question, and social isolation in terms of 10 other social ties, we found that the absence of close friends was associated (P < .01) with an increased risk of major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder; the absence of frequently contacted religious group members in a network was positively related (P < .01) to alcohol abuse and dependence, drug abuse, and nicotine dependence. Conclusions: These results suggest that social isolation is common in the United States and is associated with a higher risk of mental health problems. Results provide valuable information for prevention and treatment. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMood Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Isolation - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshUnited States - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleThe association between social isolation and DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders: Wave 2 of the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChou, KL: klchou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChou, KL=rp00583en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4088/JCP.10m06019gryen_US
dc.identifier.pmid21295001en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81755162089en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81755162089&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume72en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage1468en_US
dc.identifier.epage1476en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297567700005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChou, KL=7201905320en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, K=37665184700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSareen, J=6602942518en_US

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