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Article: Schizophrenia literacy among Chinese in Shanghai, China: A comparison with Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne and Chinese in Hong Kong

TitleSchizophrenia literacy among Chinese in Shanghai, China: A comparison with Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne and Chinese in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anp
Citation
Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2011, v. 45 n. 7, p. 524-531 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The study reported in this paper was aimed at developing understanding of schizophrenia-related knowledge and preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods among Chinese living in Shanghai, China. Method: A multi-stage cluster sampling method in which participants were taken from six of the 20 districts in Shanghai was adopted for this study. The 522 Shanghai Chinese participants were presented with a vignette describing an individual with schizophrenia before being asked questions designed to assess both their understanding of schizophrenia and their preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods. A comparative approach was adopted to identify similarities and differences between our findings and those of two previous studies on the mental health literacy of Chinese living in Melbourne, Australia and Hong Kong, respectively. Results: A lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese than Hong Kong Chinese and Australian Chinese could correctly identify the condition described in the vignette as a case of acute schizophrenia. Although a far lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed the use of counselling professionals, a much higher percentage of the same group endorsed Chinese medical doctors and herbal medication. A lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed 'lifestyle changes' as a strategy for dealing with schizophrenia than did Chinese subjects living in Australia and Hong Kong. On the other hand, a higher percentage of Shanghai residents endorsed psychiatric treatment and the traditional Chinese practices of 'eating nutritious food/taking supplements' than among the other two groups of Chinese. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for educating Chinese in Shanghai to improve their schizophrenia literacy. The contents of the education programmes will need to take into consideration the socially and culturally driven beliefs that may have been influencing the knowledge and preferences of Shanghai Chinese concerning professional help, medication, and treatment methods for people suffering from schizophrenia. © 2011 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172256
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Xen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:21:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:21:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2011, v. 45 n. 7, p. 524-531en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172256-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The study reported in this paper was aimed at developing understanding of schizophrenia-related knowledge and preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods among Chinese living in Shanghai, China. Method: A multi-stage cluster sampling method in which participants were taken from six of the 20 districts in Shanghai was adopted for this study. The 522 Shanghai Chinese participants were presented with a vignette describing an individual with schizophrenia before being asked questions designed to assess both their understanding of schizophrenia and their preferences surrounding professional help, medication, and treatment methods. A comparative approach was adopted to identify similarities and differences between our findings and those of two previous studies on the mental health literacy of Chinese living in Melbourne, Australia and Hong Kong, respectively. Results: A lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese than Hong Kong Chinese and Australian Chinese could correctly identify the condition described in the vignette as a case of acute schizophrenia. Although a far lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed the use of counselling professionals, a much higher percentage of the same group endorsed Chinese medical doctors and herbal medication. A lower percentage of Shanghai Chinese endorsed 'lifestyle changes' as a strategy for dealing with schizophrenia than did Chinese subjects living in Australia and Hong Kong. On the other hand, a higher percentage of Shanghai residents endorsed psychiatric treatment and the traditional Chinese practices of 'eating nutritious food/taking supplements' than among the other two groups of Chinese. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for educating Chinese in Shanghai to improve their schizophrenia literacy. The contents of the education programmes will need to take into consideration the socially and culturally driven beliefs that may have been influencing the knowledge and preferences of Shanghai Chinese concerning professional help, medication, and treatment methods for people suffering from schizophrenia. © 2011 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Literacy - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Drug Therapy - Therapyen_US
dc.titleSchizophrenia literacy among Chinese in Shanghai, China: A comparison with Chinese-speaking Australians in Melbourne and Chinese in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/00048674.2011.585604en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21718122-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959909189en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros256234-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959909189&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage524en_US
dc.identifier.epage531en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292272000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, X=35200589600en_US

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