File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Risk associations of obesity with sugar-sweetened beverages and lifestyle factors in Chinese: The Better Health for Better Hong Kong health promotion campaign

TitleRisk associations of obesity with sugar-sweetened beverages and lifestyle factors in Chinese: The Better Health for Better Hong Kong health promotion campaign
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
Citation
European Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2010, v. 64 n. 12, p. 1386-1392 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground/Objectives: Excessive consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increases risk of obesity. Similar data are lacking in Chinese populations with rapid nutritional transition. We aimed to examine the association between SSB intake, lifestyle factors and obesity in Hong Kong Chinese.Subjects/Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey on SSB intake with 2295 (49.6%) men and 2334 (50.4%) women (age: median 43.0 years, range 18-81 years). They were recruited from a territory-wide health promotion campaign in Hong Kong. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent simple health tests. Their SSB intake was based on a 1-week recall (1 unit of SSB250 ml, frequent SSB consumptiondaily intake2 units). Results: Men were more likely than women to smoke, drink alcohol, frequently consumed SSB (20.5 vs 9.5%) and ate more meat portions (2.32±0.57 vs 2.15±0.44) but were physically more active (no exercise: 31.2 vs 39.2%) (P-values: all 0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, frequent SSB intake remained independently associated with obesity in women (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.86 (1.36-2.55)) while physical inactivity (1.84 (1.41-2.39) for none vs regular), smoking (1.29 (1.05-1.58)) and high daily meat intake (2.15 (1.36, 3.42)) predicted obesity in men.Conclusions:In Chinese of working age, SSB consumption in women and physical inactivity, smoking and high meat intake in men were associated with obesity. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172245
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, GTen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, WYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, PTen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, SDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, SSen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:54Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2010, v. 64 n. 12, p. 1386-1392en_US
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172245-
dc.description.abstractBackground/Objectives: Excessive consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increases risk of obesity. Similar data are lacking in Chinese populations with rapid nutritional transition. We aimed to examine the association between SSB intake, lifestyle factors and obesity in Hong Kong Chinese.Subjects/Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey on SSB intake with 2295 (49.6%) men and 2334 (50.4%) women (age: median 43.0 years, range 18-81 years). They were recruited from a territory-wide health promotion campaign in Hong Kong. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent simple health tests. Their SSB intake was based on a 1-week recall (1 unit of SSB250 ml, frequent SSB consumptiondaily intake2 units). Results: Men were more likely than women to smoke, drink alcohol, frequently consumed SSB (20.5 vs 9.5%) and ate more meat portions (2.32±0.57 vs 2.15±0.44) but were physically more active (no exercise: 31.2 vs 39.2%) (P-values: all 0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, frequent SSB intake remained independently associated with obesity in women (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.86 (1.36-2.55)) while physical inactivity (1.84 (1.41-2.39) for none vs regular), smoking (1.29 (1.05-1.58)) and high daily meat intake (2.15 (1.36, 3.42)) predicted obesity in men.Conclusions:In Chinese of working age, SSB consumption in women and physical inactivity, smoking and high meat intake in men were associated with obesity. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshBeverages - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSweetening Agents - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleRisk associations of obesity with sugar-sweetened beverages and lifestyle factors in Chinese: The Better Health for Better Hong Kong health promotion campaignen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CL: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CL=rp00579en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ejcn.2010.181en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20823900-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649737275en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649737275&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume64en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1386en_US
dc.identifier.epage1392en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284826200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, GT=7103172871en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, WY=7004974019en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, CC=8252323700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, PT=15836009800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, SD=15836221200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, SS=12807724800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, R=23095001300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, A=15834166800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CL=35274549700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JC=7403287000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7860477-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats