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Article: Social anxiety disorder in older adults: Evidence from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions
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TitleSocial anxiety disorder in older adults: Evidence from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions
 
AuthorsChou, KL1
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
 
CitationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2009, v. 119 n. 1-3, p. 76-83 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2009.04.002
 
AbstractObjective: This study aims to investigate the following: 1) the association of social anxiety disorder with childhood parental loss and recent stressful life events; 2) the coexistence of social anxiety disorder and major depressive disorders (MDD); and 3) the impact of social anxiety disorder on medical conditions, obesity, health service utilization, and health-related quality of life. Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2001-2002), a national representative survey of the U.S. noninstitutionalized household population. Participants: 13,420 respondents aged 55 and above. Measurements: Social anxiety disorder was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version (AUDADIS-IV). Demographic characteristics, psychosocial risk factors, psychiatric disorders, health-related quality of life, obesity, medical conditions, and health service utilization were measured. Results: The current and lifetime prevalence rates of specific phobia were found to be 1.83% and 3.50%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that social anxiety disorder was more common among the younger age groups and those who reported stressful life events. In addition, MDD, specific phobia, and personality disorder were significantly related to social anxiety disorder. Lastly, after adjusting for other psychiatric comorbidities, the association of social anxiety disorder with health-related quality of life, medical condition, and health care service utilization became insignificant. Conclusion: The correlation between social anxiety disorder and MDD raises further questions about the nature of social anxiety disorder among older adults, but this study does not support the notion that this disorder has a strong impact on the quality of life in old age independent of other psychiatric comorbidities. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0165-0327
2013 Impact Factor: 3.705
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.847
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2009.04.002
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChou, KL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:47Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:47Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study aims to investigate the following: 1) the association of social anxiety disorder with childhood parental loss and recent stressful life events; 2) the coexistence of social anxiety disorder and major depressive disorders (MDD); and 3) the impact of social anxiety disorder on medical conditions, obesity, health service utilization, and health-related quality of life. Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2001-2002), a national representative survey of the U.S. noninstitutionalized household population. Participants: 13,420 respondents aged 55 and above. Measurements: Social anxiety disorder was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version (AUDADIS-IV). Demographic characteristics, psychosocial risk factors, psychiatric disorders, health-related quality of life, obesity, medical conditions, and health service utilization were measured. Results: The current and lifetime prevalence rates of specific phobia were found to be 1.83% and 3.50%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that social anxiety disorder was more common among the younger age groups and those who reported stressful life events. In addition, MDD, specific phobia, and personality disorder were significantly related to social anxiety disorder. Lastly, after adjusting for other psychiatric comorbidities, the association of social anxiety disorder with health-related quality of life, medical condition, and health care service utilization became insignificant. Conclusion: The correlation between social anxiety disorder and MDD raises further questions about the nature of social anxiety disorder among older adults, but this study does not support the notion that this disorder has a strong impact on the quality of life in old age independent of other psychiatric comorbidities. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2009, v. 119 n. 1-3, p. 76-83 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2009.04.002
 
dc.identifier.citeulike4714566
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2009.04.002
 
dc.identifier.epage83
 
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
2013 Impact Factor: 3.705
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.847
 
dc.identifier.issue1-3
 
dc.identifier.pmid19394088
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349775830
 
dc.identifier.spage76
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172224
 
dc.identifier.volume119
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disorders
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Orphaned - Psychology
 
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major - Complications - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Status
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLife Change Events
 
dc.subject.meshLinear Models
 
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio
 
dc.subject.meshPhobic Disorders - Complications - Epidemiology - Etiology
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis
 
dc.subject.meshUnited States - Epidemiology
 
dc.titleSocial anxiety disorder in older adults: Evidence from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong