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Article: Mental health of migrant workers in China: Prevalence and correlates

TitleMental health of migrant workers in China: Prevalence and correlates
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127
Citation
Social Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2008, v. 43 n. 6, p. 483-489 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: This study aimed to examine the prevalence and the socio-demographic correlates of mental health of migrant workers in Shanghai China. Methods: A total of 475 migrant workers from four major districts in Shanghai were recruited through a survey design with stratified random sampling. Male and female migrant workers were identified as mentally healthy or unhealthy using the brief symptom inventory. Socio-demographic characteristics and migration stress were explored as correlates of the mental health of the migrant workers. Results: A total of 73 migrant workers could be classified as mentally unhealthy (25% for men and 6% for women). Male migrant workers who were married (OR 6.16, 95% CI 1.83-20.70), manual laborers (OR 1.56, 95% CI 0.97-2.51), and experienced more stress in "financial and employment-related difficulties" (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.47-5.14) and "interpersonal tensions and conflicts" (OR 4.18, 95% CI 1.55-11.25) were more likely to be mentally unhealthy, whereas the female migrant workers who experienced more stress in "interpersonal tensions and conflicts" (OR 6.52, 95% CI 0.83-51.14) were more likely to have poor mental health. Conclusion: The findings provide information for the prevention of mental illness among migrant workers in China. The implications and limitations are also discussed. © Springer-Verlag 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172198
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.513
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:38Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2008, v. 43 n. 6, p. 483-489en_US
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172198-
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study aimed to examine the prevalence and the socio-demographic correlates of mental health of migrant workers in Shanghai China. Methods: A total of 475 migrant workers from four major districts in Shanghai were recruited through a survey design with stratified random sampling. Male and female migrant workers were identified as mentally healthy or unhealthy using the brief symptom inventory. Socio-demographic characteristics and migration stress were explored as correlates of the mental health of the migrant workers. Results: A total of 73 migrant workers could be classified as mentally unhealthy (25% for men and 6% for women). Male migrant workers who were married (OR 6.16, 95% CI 1.83-20.70), manual laborers (OR 1.56, 95% CI 0.97-2.51), and experienced more stress in "financial and employment-related difficulties" (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.47-5.14) and "interpersonal tensions and conflicts" (OR 4.18, 95% CI 1.55-11.25) were more likely to be mentally unhealthy, whereas the female migrant workers who experienced more stress in "interpersonal tensions and conflicts" (OR 6.52, 95% CI 0.83-51.14) were more likely to have poor mental health. Conclusion: The findings provide information for the prevention of mental illness among migrant workers in China. The implications and limitations are also discussed. © Springer-Verlag 2008.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Health - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTransients And Migrants - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.titleMental health of migrant workers in China: Prevalence and correlatesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DFK: dfkwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DFK=rp00593en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-008-0341-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18398559-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44949261859en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44949261859&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage483en_US
dc.identifier.epage489en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256477400008-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DFK=35231716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, X=35200589600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, G=15840333500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, Y=35268939800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, Y=23990050500en_US

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