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Article: Reciprocal relationship between pain and depression in older adults: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

TitleReciprocal relationship between pain and depression in older adults: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Citation
Journal Of Affective Disorders, 2007, v. 102 n. 1-3, p. 115-123 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown an association between pain and depression, but it is unclear which comes first. Our objectives were to determine the temporal relationship between pain and depression, and to investigate whether these two syndromes share predictors. Methods: A 2-year, population-based, prospective, observational study of 3654 older adults aged 65 and above selected from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing Waves 1 and 2. Pain, 8-item CES-D, socio-economic variables, health indicators, and social support were assessed. Results: Logistic regression analyses revealed that pain at baseline was an independent predictor of becoming depressed 2 years later and depression at baseline was a predictor of developing pain at 2 years. Individuals with mobility disability and poor sight were at risk of becoming depressed as well as developing pain. Moreover, older age, poor sight and mobility disability were common predictors for pain and depression after baselines of both syndromes were adjusted. Conclusion: Individuals who develop pain or depression are at risk for developing the other, with a spiraling risk of pain and depression. Because pain and depression share predictors, individuals who are at high risk of developing these two outcomes can be identified by aged care service practitioners. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172164
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.57
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.927
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:28Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2007, v. 102 n. 1-3, p. 115-123en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172164-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown an association between pain and depression, but it is unclear which comes first. Our objectives were to determine the temporal relationship between pain and depression, and to investigate whether these two syndromes share predictors. Methods: A 2-year, population-based, prospective, observational study of 3654 older adults aged 65 and above selected from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing Waves 1 and 2. Pain, 8-item CES-D, socio-economic variables, health indicators, and social support were assessed. Results: Logistic regression analyses revealed that pain at baseline was an independent predictor of becoming depressed 2 years later and depression at baseline was a predictor of developing pain at 2 years. Individuals with mobility disability and poor sight were at risk of becoming depressed as well as developing pain. Moreover, older age, poor sight and mobility disability were common predictors for pain and depression after baselines of both syndromes were adjusted. Conclusion: Individuals who develop pain or depression are at risk for developing the other, with a spiraling risk of pain and depression. Because pain and depression share predictors, individuals who are at high risk of developing these two outcomes can be identified by aged care service practitioners. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jaden_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshActivities Of Daily Livingen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAging - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_US
dc.subject.meshDemographyen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPain - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleReciprocal relationship between pain and depression in older adults: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChou, KL: klchou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChou, KL=rp00583en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2006.12.013en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17240455-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34447266355en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34447266355&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume102en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-3en_US
dc.identifier.spage115en_US
dc.identifier.epage123en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248823300014-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChou, KL=7201905320en_US

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