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Article: Low levels of awareness of suboptimal health conditions in a high-risk working population: The "better health for better Hong Kong" health promotion campaign

TitleLow levels of awareness of suboptimal health conditions in a high-risk working population: The "better health for better Hong Kong" health promotion campaign
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529
Citation
International Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2007, v. 14 n. 2, p. 63-69 How to Cite?
AbstractThe incidences of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes are rising in many Asian populations. In April 2000, a 5-year territory-wide health promotion campaign supported by Li Ka Shing Foundation was launched in Hong Kong by the Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority. From the general working class, 4,832 Chinese people were randomly recruited into this campaign. There were 2,370 men (49.0%) and 2,462 women (51.0%; median age = 43.0 years, range = 17-83 years). Of these, 37.5% were obese (BM1 ≥ 25 kg/m 2 or waist circumference ≥80 cm in women and ≥90 cm in men), 22.3% had hypertension, 11.6% were smokers, 31.0% had hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol ≥5.2 mmol/l), 2.2% had diabetes, and 0.7% had a past history of cardiovascular disease. There were 1,338 participants (27.7%) who had 2 or more risk factors (more men than women: 36.9% vs. 18.9%, p < .001). Despite this high prevalence of multiple risk factors, most (83.1%) perceived their health status as satisfactory (more men than women: 85.6% vs. 80.7%, p < .001). In conclusion, the combination of high prevalence of multiple risk factors and low levels of awareness of their suboptimal health status herald a looming epidemic of life-threatening diseases in a group of middle-aged Hong Kong people. Massive public education is an important and essential, although it may not be self-sufficient, factor to reduce the socioeconomic impacts of this epidemic. Copyright © 2007 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172163
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, GTCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCNen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, AWYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, PTSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, SSCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, SDYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:28Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2007, v. 14 n. 2, p. 63-69en_US
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172163-
dc.description.abstractThe incidences of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes are rising in many Asian populations. In April 2000, a 5-year territory-wide health promotion campaign supported by Li Ka Shing Foundation was launched in Hong Kong by the Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority. From the general working class, 4,832 Chinese people were randomly recruited into this campaign. There were 2,370 men (49.0%) and 2,462 women (51.0%; median age = 43.0 years, range = 17-83 years). Of these, 37.5% were obese (BM1 ≥ 25 kg/m 2 or waist circumference ≥80 cm in women and ≥90 cm in men), 22.3% had hypertension, 11.6% were smokers, 31.0% had hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol ≥5.2 mmol/l), 2.2% had diabetes, and 0.7% had a past history of cardiovascular disease. There were 1,338 participants (27.7%) who had 2 or more risk factors (more men than women: 36.9% vs. 18.9%, p < .001). Despite this high prevalence of multiple risk factors, most (83.1%) perceived their health status as satisfactory (more men than women: 85.6% vs. 80.7%, p < .001). In conclusion, the combination of high prevalence of multiple risk factors and low levels of awareness of their suboptimal health status herald a looming epidemic of life-threatening diseases in a group of middle-aged Hong Kong people. Massive public education is an important and essential, although it may not be self-sufficient, factor to reduce the socioeconomic impacts of this epidemic. Copyright © 2007 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshAwarenessen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - Epidemiology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - Epidemiology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshEmployment - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Epidemiology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleLow levels of awareness of suboptimal health conditions in a high-risk working population: The "better health for better Hong Kong" health promotion campaignen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF03004170-
dc.identifier.pmid17926433-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347402239en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros159737-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34347402239&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage63en_US
dc.identifier.epage69en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, GTC=7103172871en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JCN=7403287000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AWY=15834166800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, PTS=15836009800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, SSC=12807724800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, SDY=15836221200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, F=16743863800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_US

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