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Article: The attitudes of Chinese family caregivers of older people with dementia towards life sustaining treatments

TitleThe attitudes of Chinese family caregivers of older people with dementia towards life sustaining treatments
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 2007, v. 58 n. 3, p. 256-262 How to Cite?
AbstractAim. This paper is a report of a study to examine attitudes towards life-sustaining treatment in family caregivers of older Chinese people with dementia. Background. Deferring decisions about life-sustaining treatments to surrogate decision-makers is common among older people with dementia. However, surrogate decision-makers frequently lack knowledge about disadvantages and benefits of treatments and do not understand the principles of surrogate decision-making. Method. A total of 51 Chinese family caregivers were interviewed during 2003 and 2004. The interview included an assessment of their knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and tube feeding, a questionnaire to assess their anticipated decisions for four treatments (cardiopulmonary resuscitation, artificial ventilation, tube feeding and antibiotic administration) if the older relative suffered critical illness or irreversible coma, and their comfort and certainty in making such decisions. Findings. Family caregivers displayed poor knowledge about life-sustaining treatments, with 30 (59%) and 13 (26%) unable to name any feature of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and tube feeding, respectively. Most relied on their own views in decision-making rather than on what they thought their relative would have wanted. Most family caregivers were reluctant to forgo treatments. Nursing home residence predicted family caregivers' willingness to forgo artificial ventilation for critical illness. Financial burden predicted inclination to forgo antibiotics for critical illness and irreversible coma, as well as tube feeding in irreversible coma. Conclusion. More dialogue and education are needed about end of life issues in the early phase of dementia. Nurses should be aware of the cultural implications of surrogate decision-making for Chinese family caregivers. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172157
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorTwinn, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:27Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Advanced Nursing, 2007, v. 58 n. 3, p. 256-262en_US
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172157-
dc.description.abstractAim. This paper is a report of a study to examine attitudes towards life-sustaining treatment in family caregivers of older Chinese people with dementia. Background. Deferring decisions about life-sustaining treatments to surrogate decision-makers is common among older people with dementia. However, surrogate decision-makers frequently lack knowledge about disadvantages and benefits of treatments and do not understand the principles of surrogate decision-making. Method. A total of 51 Chinese family caregivers were interviewed during 2003 and 2004. The interview included an assessment of their knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and tube feeding, a questionnaire to assess their anticipated decisions for four treatments (cardiopulmonary resuscitation, artificial ventilation, tube feeding and antibiotic administration) if the older relative suffered critical illness or irreversible coma, and their comfort and certainty in making such decisions. Findings. Family caregivers displayed poor knowledge about life-sustaining treatments, with 30 (59%) and 13 (26%) unable to name any feature of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and tube feeding, respectively. Most relied on their own views in decision-making rather than on what they thought their relative would have wanted. Most family caregivers were reluctant to forgo treatments. Nursing home residence predicted family caregivers' willingness to forgo artificial ventilation for critical illness. Financial burden predicted inclination to forgo antibiotics for critical illness and irreversible coma, as well as tube feeding in irreversible coma. Conclusion. More dialogue and education are needed about end of life issues in the early phase of dementia. Nurses should be aware of the cultural implications of surrogate decision-making for Chinese family caregivers. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Advanced Nursing. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Education - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Health - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCaregivers - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCultureen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_US
dc.subject.meshDementia - Psychology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnteral Nutrition - Methods - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshEthics, Nursingen_US
dc.subject.meshFamilyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNurses - Organization & Administrationen_US
dc.titleThe attitudes of Chinese family caregivers of older people with dementia towards life sustaining treatmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYan, E: elsieyan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYan, E=rp00600en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04230.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17474914-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34247352523en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros136933-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34247352523&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume58en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage256en_US
dc.identifier.epage262en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2648-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245812800006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, T=7006475934en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTwinn, S=7003480626en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, E=7003669102en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1243134-

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