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Article: Psychological distress in migrants in Australia over 50 years old: A longitudinal investigation

TitlePsychological distress in migrants in Australia over 50 years old: A longitudinal investigation
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Citation
Journal Of Affective Disorders, 2007, v. 98 n. 1-2, p. 99-108 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Although it is a well-known fact that migration is a risk factor contributing to psychopathology, little is known in migrants who migrated in their old age. The present study examined whether origin of countries and visa types predicted psychological distress over a period of 1 year and whether their association changed after factors in health, social roles, cohort effect and social support were adjusted. Methods: A nationwide representative sample of 431 migrants who aged 50 and above were interviewed in 2000-2001 and 359 of them were re-interviewed 1 year after the baseline assessment. 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used measure psychological distress and a series of questions regarding socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, living alone), days in Australia, origin of countries, visa types, health, social role, cohort effect, and social support were also included. Results: GHQ-12 scores did deteriorate over a period of 1 year among older migrants to Australia. In multiple regression analyses, origin of countries and visa types were significant predictors of future GHQ-12 scores. Baseline GHQ-12 scores, age, gender, living alone, days in Australia, poor self-rated health, the presence of heart disease, diabetes, and asthma, being a student or economically inactive, widowhood or divorce, as well as education were also significant predictors of GHQ-12 scores at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The status of refugees predicts future psychological distress in older migrants even when other known correlates of psychological distress are controlled. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172144
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.57
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.927
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:22Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Affective Disorders, 2007, v. 98 n. 1-2, p. 99-108en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172144-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although it is a well-known fact that migration is a risk factor contributing to psychopathology, little is known in migrants who migrated in their old age. The present study examined whether origin of countries and visa types predicted psychological distress over a period of 1 year and whether their association changed after factors in health, social roles, cohort effect and social support were adjusted. Methods: A nationwide representative sample of 431 migrants who aged 50 and above were interviewed in 2000-2001 and 359 of them were re-interviewed 1 year after the baseline assessment. 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used measure psychological distress and a series of questions regarding socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, living alone), days in Australia, origin of countries, visa types, health, social role, cohort effect, and social support were also included. Results: GHQ-12 scores did deteriorate over a period of 1 year among older migrants to Australia. In multiple regression analyses, origin of countries and visa types were significant predictors of future GHQ-12 scores. Baseline GHQ-12 scores, age, gender, living alone, days in Australia, poor self-rated health, the presence of heart disease, diabetes, and asthma, being a student or economically inactive, widowhood or divorce, as well as education were also significant predictors of GHQ-12 scores at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The status of refugees predicts future psychological distress in older migrants even when other known correlates of psychological distress are controlled. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jaden_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTransients And Migrants - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.titlePsychological distress in migrants in Australia over 50 years old: A longitudinal investigationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChou, KL: klchou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChou, KL=rp00583en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2006.07.002en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16890296-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845986024en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845986024&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume98en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_US
dc.identifier.spage99en_US
dc.identifier.epage108en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244116700010-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChou, KL=7201905320en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11918570-

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