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Article: Reciprocal relationship between pain and depression in elderly chinese primary care patients

TitleReciprocal relationship between pain and depression in elderly chinese primary care patients
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2005, v. 20 n. 10, p. 945-952 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Pain and depression are common in old age but the reciprocal relationship between pain and depression has not been established in a single study. Moreover, few studies have addressed this issue in a primary care setting. The purposes of this study were to examine the reciprocal relationship between pain and depression and to identify whether social support, functional disability or social functioning mediated the link between pain and depression among Hong Kong Chinese elderly primary care patients. Method: Subjects were 318 patients assessed by a trained assessor with MDS-HC at baseline and these subjects were randomly selected from attendants of three randomly selected elderly health centers in Hong Kong. These patients were re-assessed one year after baseline evaluation. Results: Multiple regression analyses revealed that pain at baseline significantly predicted depression at 12-month follow-up assessment when age, gender, martial status, education, and depression at baseline were adjusted for, but depression at baseline was not associated with pain at 12-months after baseline measure while controlling for age, gender, martial status, education, and pain at baseline. However, depression did predict the onset of pain. Moreover, social support, physical disability or social functioning did not mediate the impact of pain on depression. Conclusions: These data suggest that pain is an important predictor of depression in elderly primary care patients. Therefore, aged care service practitioners must take this risk factor into consideration in their preventive intervention and treatment for psychological well-being. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172118
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChi, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:13Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2005, v. 20 n. 10, p. 945-952en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172118-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pain and depression are common in old age but the reciprocal relationship between pain and depression has not been established in a single study. Moreover, few studies have addressed this issue in a primary care setting. The purposes of this study were to examine the reciprocal relationship between pain and depression and to identify whether social support, functional disability or social functioning mediated the link between pain and depression among Hong Kong Chinese elderly primary care patients. Method: Subjects were 318 patients assessed by a trained assessor with MDS-HC at baseline and these subjects were randomly selected from attendants of three randomly selected elderly health centers in Hong Kong. These patients were re-assessed one year after baseline evaluation. Results: Multiple regression analyses revealed that pain at baseline significantly predicted depression at 12-month follow-up assessment when age, gender, martial status, education, and depression at baseline were adjusted for, but depression at baseline was not associated with pain at 12-months after baseline measure while controlling for age, gender, martial status, education, and pain at baseline. However, depression did predict the onset of pain. Moreover, social support, physical disability or social functioning did not mediate the impact of pain on depression. Conclusions: These data suggest that pain is an important predictor of depression in elderly primary care patients. Therefore, aged care service practitioners must take this risk factor into consideration in their preventive intervention and treatment for psychological well-being. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshActivities Of Daily Livingen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisability Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLonelinessen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPain - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Environmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleReciprocal relationship between pain and depression in elderly chinese primary care patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChou, KL: klchou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChou, KL=rp00583en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.1383en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16163745-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-30344462687en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-30344462687&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage945en_US
dc.identifier.epage952en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232680400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChou, KL=7201905320en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChi, I=7005697907en_US

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