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Article: Prevalence of depression among elderly Chinese with diabetes

TitlePrevalence of depression among elderly Chinese with diabetes
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2005, v. 20 n. 6, p. 570-575 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: To examine the association between diabetes and depression among older Chinese and to determine the extent to which depression is mediated by physical disability and diabetes-related comorbid conditions. Method: Cross-sectional analysis of data from a population-based study composed of a representative sample of 2003 non-institutionalized older adults aged 60 and older living in Hong Kong who agreed to participate in the study. We examined the relation between diabetes and depression (measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale). Result: 12% of the older adults reported physician-diagnosed diabetes and amongst these older persons with diabetes, 26% of them reported elated level of depressive symptoms. Logistic regression analyses revealed that diabetes was significantly related to depression even when controlling for age, gender, marital status, and education. More importantly, adjusted for self-reported disability in three domains including self-care, mobility, and higher functioning did not attenuate this association but the association disappeared after we adjusted for four diabetes-related complications including heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and vision problems. Conclusion: Diabetes is associated with depression and this association appears to be mediated by prevalent diabetes complications. This is of particular clinical important because although depression is often overlooked in the aged population, effective treatment is available and can result in improved medical outcomes. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172104
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChi, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:20:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:20:09Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2005, v. 20 n. 6, p. 570-575en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172104-
dc.description.abstractBackground: To examine the association between diabetes and depression among older Chinese and to determine the extent to which depression is mediated by physical disability and diabetes-related comorbid conditions. Method: Cross-sectional analysis of data from a population-based study composed of a representative sample of 2003 non-institutionalized older adults aged 60 and older living in Hong Kong who agreed to participate in the study. We examined the relation between diabetes and depression (measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale). Result: 12% of the older adults reported physician-diagnosed diabetes and amongst these older persons with diabetes, 26% of them reported elated level of depressive symptoms. Logistic regression analyses revealed that diabetes was significantly related to depression even when controlling for age, gender, marital status, and education. More importantly, adjusted for self-reported disability in three domains including self-care, mobility, and higher functioning did not attenuate this association but the association disappeared after we adjusted for four diabetes-related complications including heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and vision problems. Conclusion: Diabetes is associated with depression and this association appears to be mediated by prevalent diabetes complications. This is of particular clinical important because although depression is often overlooked in the aged population, effective treatment is available and can result in improved medical outcomes. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_US
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Complications - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisability Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.titlePrevalence of depression among elderly Chinese with diabetesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChou, KL: klchou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChou, KL=rp00583en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.1328en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15920708-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21044456758en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros101355-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-21044456758&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage570en_US
dc.identifier.epage575en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229980300009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChou, KL=7201905320en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChi, I=7005697907en_US

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