File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A body-mind-spirit model in health: An Eastern approach

TitleA body-mind-spirit model in health: An Eastern approach
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at hhttp://www.tandfonline.com/WSHC
Citation
Social Work In Health Care, 2001, v. 34 n. 3-4, p. 261-282 How to Cite?
AbstractUnder the division of labor of Western medicine, the medical physician treats the body of patients, the social worker attends to their emotions and social relations, while the pastoral counselor provides spiritual guidance. Body, mind, cognition, emotion and spirituality are seen as discrete entities. In striking contrast, Eastern philosophies of Buddhism, Taoism and traditional Chinese medicine adopt a holistic conceptualization of an individual and his or her environment. In this view, health is perceived as a harmonious equilibrium that exists between the interplay of 'yin' and 'yang': the five internal elements (metal, wood, water, fire and earth), the six environmental conditions (dry, wet, hot, cold, wind and flame), other external sources of harm (physical injury, insect bites, poison, overeat and overwork), and the seven emotions (joy, sorrow, anger, worry, panic, anxiety and fear). The authors have adopted a body-mind-spirit integrated model of intervention to promote the health of their Chinese clients. Indeed, research results on these body-mind-spirit groups for cancer patients, bereaved wives and divorced women have shown very positive intervention outcomes. There are significant improvements in their physical health, mental health, sense of control and social support. © 2001 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172051
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.8
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.354
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:19:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:19:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Work In Health Care, 2001, v. 34 n. 3-4, p. 261-282en_US
dc.identifier.issn0098-1389en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/172051-
dc.description.abstractUnder the division of labor of Western medicine, the medical physician treats the body of patients, the social worker attends to their emotions and social relations, while the pastoral counselor provides spiritual guidance. Body, mind, cognition, emotion and spirituality are seen as discrete entities. In striking contrast, Eastern philosophies of Buddhism, Taoism and traditional Chinese medicine adopt a holistic conceptualization of an individual and his or her environment. In this view, health is perceived as a harmonious equilibrium that exists between the interplay of 'yin' and 'yang': the five internal elements (metal, wood, water, fire and earth), the six environmental conditions (dry, wet, hot, cold, wind and flame), other external sources of harm (physical injury, insect bites, poison, overeat and overwork), and the seven emotions (joy, sorrow, anger, worry, panic, anxiety and fear). The authors have adopted a body-mind-spirit integrated model of intervention to promote the health of their Chinese clients. Indeed, research results on these body-mind-spirit groups for cancer patients, bereaved wives and divorced women have shown very positive intervention outcomes. There are significant improvements in their physical health, mental health, sense of control and social support. © 2001 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at hhttp://www.tandfonline.com/WSHCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Work in Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBreathing Exercisesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGriefen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicine, East Asian Traditionalen_US
dc.subject.meshMind-Body Relations, Metaphysicalen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - Psychology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Work - Methodsen_US
dc.titleA body-mind-spirit model in health: An Eastern approachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, C: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, C=rp00579en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1300/J010v34n03_02en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12243428-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035551813en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035551813&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage261en_US
dc.identifier.epage282en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, C=35274549700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, E=35978688800en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats