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Article: Weight changes and their associations with demographic and clinical characteristics in risperidone maintenance treatment for schizophrenia

TitleWeight changes and their associations with demographic and clinical characteristics in risperidone maintenance treatment for schizophrenia
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.de/pharmaco
Citation
Pharmacopsychiatry, 2011, v. 44 n. 4, p. 135-141 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This study aimed to characterize weight changes in schizophrenia patients taking risperidone as part of a randomized, controlled, open-label clinical trial. Methods: A total of 374 patients with schizophrenia who had been clinically stabilized following an acute episode were randomly assigned to a no-dose-reduction group (initial optimal therapeutic doses continued throughout the study), a 4-week group (initial optimal therapeutic doses continued for 4 weeks followed by a half dose reduction that was maintained until the end of the study) or a 26-week group (initial optimal therapeutic doses continued for 26 weeks followed by a half dose reduction until the end of the study). Participants were assessed monthly using standardized assessment instruments during the first 6 months, and then every 2 months until the last recruited patient completed the 1-year follow-up. Weight gain was defined as gaining at least 7% of initial body weight, weight loss as losing at least 7% of initial body weight. A BMI <18.5kgm 2 was defined as underweight, 18.524.9kgm 2 as normal range, and 25kgm 2 as overweight or obese. Results: At the end of follow-up, of the patients who started within the underweight range (n=22), 77.3% gained weight, whereas 4.5% lost weight. The corresponding figures were 39.6% and 4.8% in patients who started at normal weight (n=273), respectively, and 17.7% and 17.7% in patients who started at overweight (n=79), respectively. At the same time, 59.1% of the patients who started at underweight range went into the normal weight and 13.6% into the overweight/obese range, respectively, while 24.5% of those who started at normal weight went into the overweight/obese range, and 1.1% into underweight range, respectively; 20.3% of those who started at overweight range went into normal weight at the end of the follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that being underweight or normal weight at study entry predicted weight gain compared to being overweight, whereas being overweight at entry was associated with a higher likelihood of weight loss compared to being normal weight. No correlation was found between weight change and dose reduction. Conclusions: Weight change is a common, long-term, but heterogeneous side effect in risperidone maintenance treatment for stable schizophrenia patients. Special attention should be paid to fluctuations in weight that may occur throughout the course of treatment with risperidone. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart - New York.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171964
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.474
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.654
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXiang, YTen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorUngvari, GSen_US
dc.contributor.authorKreyenbuhl, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, HFKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, KYCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, EHMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBo, QJen_US
dc.contributor.authorDixon, LBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPharmacopsychiatry, 2011, v. 44 n. 4, p. 135-141en_US
dc.identifier.issn0176-3679en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171964-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study aimed to characterize weight changes in schizophrenia patients taking risperidone as part of a randomized, controlled, open-label clinical trial. Methods: A total of 374 patients with schizophrenia who had been clinically stabilized following an acute episode were randomly assigned to a no-dose-reduction group (initial optimal therapeutic doses continued throughout the study), a 4-week group (initial optimal therapeutic doses continued for 4 weeks followed by a half dose reduction that was maintained until the end of the study) or a 26-week group (initial optimal therapeutic doses continued for 26 weeks followed by a half dose reduction until the end of the study). Participants were assessed monthly using standardized assessment instruments during the first 6 months, and then every 2 months until the last recruited patient completed the 1-year follow-up. Weight gain was defined as gaining at least 7% of initial body weight, weight loss as losing at least 7% of initial body weight. A BMI <18.5kgm 2 was defined as underweight, 18.524.9kgm 2 as normal range, and 25kgm 2 as overweight or obese. Results: At the end of follow-up, of the patients who started within the underweight range (n=22), 77.3% gained weight, whereas 4.5% lost weight. The corresponding figures were 39.6% and 4.8% in patients who started at normal weight (n=273), respectively, and 17.7% and 17.7% in patients who started at overweight (n=79), respectively. At the same time, 59.1% of the patients who started at underweight range went into the normal weight and 13.6% into the overweight/obese range, respectively, while 24.5% of those who started at normal weight went into the overweight/obese range, and 1.1% into underweight range, respectively; 20.3% of those who started at overweight range went into normal weight at the end of the follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that being underweight or normal weight at study entry predicted weight gain compared to being overweight, whereas being overweight at entry was associated with a higher likelihood of weight loss compared to being normal weight. No correlation was found between weight change and dose reduction. Conclusions: Weight change is a common, long-term, but heterogeneous side effect in risperidone maintenance treatment for stable schizophrenia patients. Special attention should be paid to fluctuations in weight that may occur throughout the course of treatment with risperidone. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart - New York.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.de/pharmacoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPharmacopsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAntipsychotic Agents - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effects - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Weight - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshBrief Psychiatric Rating Scaleen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Monitoringen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedication Adherenceen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOverweight - Chemically Induced - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Dropoutsen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrence - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshRisperidone - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effects - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Complications - Drug Therapy - Physiopathology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshThinness - Chemically Induced - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleWeight changes and their associations with demographic and clinical characteristics in risperidone maintenance treatment for schizophreniaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, EHM:edwinlhm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EHM=rp01575en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0031-1277178en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21710403-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959449683en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros206296-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959449683&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage135en_US
dc.identifier.epage141en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292891300003-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiang, YT=35241398400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, CY=7501646810en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridUngvari, GS=7006092063en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKreyenbuhl, JA=6602795669en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, HFK=24447976700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, KYC=8593944800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, EHM=7406967099en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBo, QJ=35799418800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDixon, LB=35372257700en_US

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