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Article: Neurological soft signs and their relationships to neurocognitive functions: A re-visit with the structural equation modeling design

TitleNeurological soft signs and their relationships to neurocognitive functions: A re-visit with the structural equation modeling design
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2009, v. 4 n. 12 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Neurological soft signs and neurocognitive impairments have long been considered important features of schizophrenia. Previous correlational studies have suggested that there is a significant relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive functions. The purpose of the current study was to examine the underlying relationships between these two distinct constructs with structural equation modeling (SEM). Methods: 118 patients with schizophrenia and 160 healthy controls were recruited for the current study. The abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) and a set of neurocognitive function tests were administered to all participants. SEM was then conducted independently in these two samples to examine the relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive functions. Results: Both the measurement and structural models showed that the models fit well to the data in both patients and healthy controls. The structural equations also showed that there were modest to moderate associations among neurological soft signs, executive attention, verbal memory, and visual memory, while the healthy controls showed more limited associations. Conclusions: The current findings indicate that motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition contribute to the latent construct of neurological soft signs, whereas the subset of neurocognitive function tests contribute to the latent constructs of executive attention, verbal memory, and visual memory in the present sample. Greater evidence of neurological soft signs is associated with more severe impairment of executive attention and memory functions. Clinical and theoretical implications of the model findings are discussed. © 2009 Chan et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171957
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_US
dc.contributor.authorManschreck, TCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, ZJen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorGong, QYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:49Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2009, v. 4 n. 12en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171957-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Neurological soft signs and neurocognitive impairments have long been considered important features of schizophrenia. Previous correlational studies have suggested that there is a significant relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive functions. The purpose of the current study was to examine the underlying relationships between these two distinct constructs with structural equation modeling (SEM). Methods: 118 patients with schizophrenia and 160 healthy controls were recruited for the current study. The abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) and a set of neurocognitive function tests were administered to all participants. SEM was then conducted independently in these two samples to examine the relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive functions. Results: Both the measurement and structural models showed that the models fit well to the data in both patients and healthy controls. The structural equations also showed that there were modest to moderate associations among neurological soft signs, executive attention, verbal memory, and visual memory, while the healthy controls showed more limited associations. Conclusions: The current findings indicate that motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition contribute to the latent construct of neurological soft signs, whereas the subset of neurocognitive function tests contribute to the latent constructs of executive attention, verbal memory, and visual memory in the present sample. Greater evidence of neurological soft signs is associated with more severe impairment of executive attention and memory functions. Clinical and theoretical implications of the model findings are discussed. © 2009 Chan et al.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleNeurological soft signs and their relationships to neurocognitive functions: A re-visit with the structural equation modeling designen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH:eyhchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0008469en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20041110-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77949538390en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77949538390&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273104000026-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, RCK=35236280300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Y=7601489365en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=36068616200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EYH=7402315729en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridManschreck, TC=7005976353en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ZJ=24278641400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, X=35104208800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGong, QY=7201440871en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9052976-

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