File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Relationships between seizure duration and seizure threshold and stimulus dosage at electroconvulsive therapy: Implications for electroconvulsive therapy practice

TitleRelationships between seizure duration and seizure threshold and stimulus dosage at electroconvulsive therapy: Implications for electroconvulsive therapy practice
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PCN
Citation
Psychiatry And Clinical Neurosciences, 2002, v. 56 n. 5, p. 521-526 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent studies cast doubt on the usefulness of seizure duration as an index for stimulus dosage adjustment at electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A retrospective analysis on the relationships between seizure duration and seizure threshold and stimulus dosage was performed for 54 patients who received a standardized ECT dose titration and treatment protocol. Subjects receiving stimulus dosage at seizure threshold had a highly variable motor seizure duration, ranging from 15 to 89s, and 7.4% of subjects had seizures longer than 60s. Regression analysis showed that initial seizure threshold and height were independent predictors of motor seizure duration during dose titration and accounted for 34% of its variance. Stimulus dosage was increased by 40-67% between the first and second ECT session; however, 60% of subjects had no lengthening of seizures and motor seizure duration was significantly shorter at the second treatment (mean ± SD: 35.7 ± 12.3 vs 31.0 ± 10.6 s; paired t = 2.9, d.f. = 34, P = 0.006). At the first and second ECT treatment, motor seizure duration was significantly related to stimulus dosage (r=-0.45 and r= -0.41, respectively). Given the negative correlation between seizure duration and stimulus intensity, a policy that recommends an increase of stimulus dosage and its reduction for patients with short and long seizures, respectively, does not necessarily result in 'optimal' seizure duration. A better dosing policy that places less emphasis on seizure duration is proposed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171913
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.025
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.928
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry And Clinical Neurosciences, 2002, v. 56 n. 5, p. 521-526en_US
dc.identifier.issn1323-1316en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171913-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies cast doubt on the usefulness of seizure duration as an index for stimulus dosage adjustment at electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A retrospective analysis on the relationships between seizure duration and seizure threshold and stimulus dosage was performed for 54 patients who received a standardized ECT dose titration and treatment protocol. Subjects receiving stimulus dosage at seizure threshold had a highly variable motor seizure duration, ranging from 15 to 89s, and 7.4% of subjects had seizures longer than 60s. Regression analysis showed that initial seizure threshold and height were independent predictors of motor seizure duration during dose titration and accounted for 34% of its variance. Stimulus dosage was increased by 40-67% between the first and second ECT session; however, 60% of subjects had no lengthening of seizures and motor seizure duration was significantly shorter at the second treatment (mean ± SD: 35.7 ± 12.3 vs 31.0 ± 10.6 s; paired t = 2.9, d.f. = 34, P = 0.006). At the first and second ECT treatment, motor seizure duration was significantly related to stimulus dosage (r=-0.45 and r= -0.41, respectively). Given the negative correlation between seizure duration and stimulus intensity, a policy that recommends an increase of stimulus dosage and its reduction for patients with short and long seizures, respectively, does not necessarily result in 'optimal' seizure duration. A better dosing policy that places less emphasis on seizure duration is proposed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PCNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshElectroconvulsive Therapy - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSeizures - Etiology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleRelationships between seizure duration and seizure threshold and stimulus dosage at electroconvulsive therapy: Implications for electroconvulsive therapy practiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF:kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1440-1819.2002.01048.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid12193241-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036791656en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros82477-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036791656&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume56en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage521en_US
dc.identifier.epage526en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177597300006-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats