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Article: Rationales for food refusal in Chinese patients with anorexia nervosa

TitleRationales for food refusal in Chinese patients with anorexia nervosa
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698
Citation
International Journal Of Eating Disorders, 2001, v. 29 n. 2, p. 224-229 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To study the rationales for food refusal among Chinese patients with typical and atypical anorexia nervosa. Method: Forty-eight consecutive patients with broadly defined anorexia nervosa underwent evaluation with a self-report rationale for food refusal questionnaire, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and other clinical assessments. Results: Fat-phobic patients (N = 32) had a significantly higher premorbid body mass index than non-fat-phobic patients (N = 16), but they did not differ on other clinical parameters, GHQ-12, BDI-21, and HDRS scores. At clinical presentation, 3 months, and I year prior to presentation, fat phobia and stomach bloating were the most common rationales for food refusal among fat-phobic and non-fat-phobic patients, respectively. A total of 31% of fat-phobic patients endorsed non-fat-phobic rationales at the time of clinical presentation, whereas non-fat-phobic patients adhered to non-fat-phobic attributions more consistently. Discussion: The rationales used by anorexic patients to explain noneating are more varied than implied in the 4th ed. of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavior Disorders: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. A broadened conceptualization of anorexia nervosa may enhance an understanding of patients' illness experiences and enliven research on eating disorders. © 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171905
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.068
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.930
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgai, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, DTSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWing, YKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:21Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Eating Disorders, 2001, v. 29 n. 2, p. 224-229en_US
dc.identifier.issn0276-3478en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171905-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To study the rationales for food refusal among Chinese patients with typical and atypical anorexia nervosa. Method: Forty-eight consecutive patients with broadly defined anorexia nervosa underwent evaluation with a self-report rationale for food refusal questionnaire, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and other clinical assessments. Results: Fat-phobic patients (N = 32) had a significantly higher premorbid body mass index than non-fat-phobic patients (N = 16), but they did not differ on other clinical parameters, GHQ-12, BDI-21, and HDRS scores. At clinical presentation, 3 months, and I year prior to presentation, fat phobia and stomach bloating were the most common rationales for food refusal among fat-phobic and non-fat-phobic patients, respectively. A total of 31% of fat-phobic patients endorsed non-fat-phobic rationales at the time of clinical presentation, whereas non-fat-phobic patients adhered to non-fat-phobic attributions more consistently. Discussion: The rationales used by anorexic patients to explain noneating are more varied than implied in the 4th ed. of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavior Disorders: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. A broadened conceptualization of anorexia nervosa may enhance an understanding of patients' illness experiences and enliven research on eating disorders. © 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Eating Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnorexia Nervosa - Ethnology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFooden_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.titleRationales for food refusal in Chinese patients with anorexia nervosaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM:amlee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/1098-108X(200103)29:2<224::AID-EAT1012>3.0.CO;2-Ren_US
dc.identifier.pmid11429985-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035117494en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242707-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035117494&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage224en_US
dc.identifier.epage229en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166971300013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, S=8695933800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgai, E=23106979200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, DTS=37047044600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWing, YK=7004821189en_US

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