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Article: Neurological soft signs in obsessive compulsive disorder: Standardised assessment and comparison with schizophrenia

TitleNeurological soft signs in obsessive compulsive disorder: Standardised assessment and comparison with schizophrenia
Authors
KeywordsNeurological Soft Signs
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Schizophrenia
Specificity
Issue Date1998
PublisherIOS Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iospress.nl/html/09534180.php
Citation
Behavioural Neurology, 1998, v. 11 n. 4, p. 197-204 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile several studies have detected raised levels of neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), the specificity of these abnormalities remains uncertain. This study used a new standardised measure, the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI), to assess soft signs in 51 subjects with OCD. Comparison was made with data on patients with schizophrenia and a non-clinical control group from a previously reported study. Individuals with OCD showed raised levels of soft signs compared with non-clinical controls in many categories of the CNI: Motor Coordination, Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes, Extrapyramidal Signs, and Failure of Suppression. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, the OCD group had lower levels of neurological signs in some CNI categories: Hard Signs, Motor Co-ordination, Tardive Dyskinesia, Catatonic Signs, and Extrapyramidal Signs. However, levels of soft signs in the OCD group did not significantly differ from those in the schizophrenia group in other CNI categories: Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes and Failure of Suppression. The significance of these patterns of findings is discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.629
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.696
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBolton, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorGibb, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorLees, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorRaven, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorShafran, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationBehavioural Neurology, 1998, v. 11 n. 4, p. 197-204en_US
dc.identifier.issn0953-4180en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171894-
dc.description.abstractWhile several studies have detected raised levels of neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), the specificity of these abnormalities remains uncertain. This study used a new standardised measure, the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI), to assess soft signs in 51 subjects with OCD. Comparison was made with data on patients with schizophrenia and a non-clinical control group from a previously reported study. Individuals with OCD showed raised levels of soft signs compared with non-clinical controls in many categories of the CNI: Motor Coordination, Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes, Extrapyramidal Signs, and Failure of Suppression. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, the OCD group had lower levels of neurological signs in some CNI categories: Hard Signs, Motor Co-ordination, Tardive Dyskinesia, Catatonic Signs, and Extrapyramidal Signs. However, levels of soft signs in the OCD group did not significantly differ from those in the schizophrenia group in other CNI categories: Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes and Failure of Suppression. The significance of these patterns of findings is discussed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherIOS Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iospress.nl/html/09534180.phpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioural Neurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurological Soft Signsen_US
dc.subjectObsessive-Compulsive Disorderen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_US
dc.subjectSpecificityen_US
dc.titleNeurological soft signs in obsessive compulsive disorder: Standardised assessment and comparison with schizophreniaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, E:eyhchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, E=rp00392en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032230757en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros61603-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032230757&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage197en_US
dc.identifier.epage204en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBolton, D=35769140700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGibb, W=7006291972en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLees, A=23988930400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaven, P=7102584165en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGray, JA=7404300712en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, E=7402315729en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShafran, R=7003543961en_US

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