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Article: Cross-cultural validity of the eating disorder inventory: A study of Chinese patients with eating disorders in Hong Kong

TitleCross-cultural validity of the eating disorder inventory: A study of Chinese patients with eating disorders in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698
Citation
International Journal Of Eating Disorders, 1998, v. 23 n. 2, p. 177-188 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the cross-cultural validity of the Chinese version of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) in a clinical sample of patients with eating disorders in Hong Kong. Method: After comprehensive clinical assessment, a consecutive series (1990-1996) of Chinese patients with bulimia nervosa (N = 17) and broadly diagnosed anorexia nervosa (N = 26) completed the Chinese EDI. Results were compared with those of Chinese female undergraduates (N = 606) and Canadian patients with eating disorders. Results: The EDI profiles of bulimic and fat phobic anorectic patients were remarkably and modestly similar to those of their Canadian counterparts. The EDI meaningfully distinguished bulimic patients and fat phobic anorectic patients from local undergraduates, but exhibited deficient criterion- related validity in nonfat phobic anorectic patients. Discussion: The questionable validity of certain EDI subscales in nonfat phobic patients reflects the ethnospecific constructs upon which they are based, and weakens the efficacy of the EDI in screening for anorexia nervosa in Chinese populations. Apart from illustrating some of the conceptual and methodological issues that need to be tackled in the cross-cultural study of the eating disorders, this study furnishes empirical support for the syndromal homogeneity of bulimia nervosa, and the clinical grouping of anorexia nervosa into fat phobic and nonfat phobic subtypes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171893
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.068
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.930
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:18:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Eating Disorders, 1998, v. 23 n. 2, p. 177-188en_US
dc.identifier.issn0276-3478en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171893-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the cross-cultural validity of the Chinese version of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) in a clinical sample of patients with eating disorders in Hong Kong. Method: After comprehensive clinical assessment, a consecutive series (1990-1996) of Chinese patients with bulimia nervosa (N = 17) and broadly diagnosed anorexia nervosa (N = 26) completed the Chinese EDI. Results were compared with those of Chinese female undergraduates (N = 606) and Canadian patients with eating disorders. Results: The EDI profiles of bulimic and fat phobic anorectic patients were remarkably and modestly similar to those of their Canadian counterparts. The EDI meaningfully distinguished bulimic patients and fat phobic anorectic patients from local undergraduates, but exhibited deficient criterion- related validity in nonfat phobic anorectic patients. Discussion: The questionable validity of certain EDI subscales in nonfat phobic patients reflects the ethnospecific constructs upon which they are based, and weakens the efficacy of the EDI in screening for anorexia nervosa in Chinese populations. Apart from illustrating some of the conceptual and methodological issues that need to be tackled in the cross-cultural study of the eating disorders, this study furnishes empirical support for the syndromal homogeneity of bulimia nervosa, and the clinical grouping of anorexia nervosa into fat phobic and nonfat phobic subtypes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34698en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Eating Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnorexia - Diagnosis - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Imageen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshBulimia - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshCanadaen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.meshDiscriminant Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPhobic Disorders - Diagnosis - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometrics - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_US
dc.titleCross-cultural validity of the eating disorder inventory: A study of Chinese patients with eating disorders in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM:amlee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1098-108X(199803)23:2<177::AID-EAT8>3.0.CO;2-Hen_US
dc.identifier.pmid9503243-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031886841en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242561-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031886841&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume23en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage177en_US
dc.identifier.epage188en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072005800008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, S=8695933800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, T=15739768600en_US

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