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Article: Situating administrative responsibility: A comparison of medival Christian and medieval Islamic administrative thought

TitleSituating administrative responsibility: A comparison of medival Christian and medieval Islamic administrative thought
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0033-3298
Citation
Public Administration, 2006, v. 84 n. 3, p. 563-581 How to Cite?
AbstractContemporary studies of administrative thought allow only a limited range of viability for medieval and non-Western thought on the subject of public administration. This tendency belies the wealth of thought embedded within this broad literature. This paper investigates the matter of administrative accountability and responsibility through the lens of a comparative theorist of historical administrative thought. In order to assess the explanatory potential of early and non-Western administrative studies, two texts have been chosen, both previously unanalysed in conjunction (to the best of my knowledge) from the perspective of the administrative theorist - John of Salisbury's Policraticus and Abu al-Hassan Al-Mawardi's Al-Akham al-Sultaniyya w'al-Wilayat al Diniyya (The Ordinances of Government). Through an analysis of ideas of delegation and responsibility within these texts, the paper seeks to develop a critique of the place of revealed religious authority in the solution to the questions 'who are administrators responsible to?' and 'what are administrators responsible for?' © Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171840
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.922
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.460
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJordan, SRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:45Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationPublic Administration, 2006, v. 84 n. 3, p. 563-581en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-3298en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171840-
dc.description.abstractContemporary studies of administrative thought allow only a limited range of viability for medieval and non-Western thought on the subject of public administration. This tendency belies the wealth of thought embedded within this broad literature. This paper investigates the matter of administrative accountability and responsibility through the lens of a comparative theorist of historical administrative thought. In order to assess the explanatory potential of early and non-Western administrative studies, two texts have been chosen, both previously unanalysed in conjunction (to the best of my knowledge) from the perspective of the administrative theorist - John of Salisbury's Policraticus and Abu al-Hassan Al-Mawardi's Al-Akham al-Sultaniyya w'al-Wilayat al Diniyya (The Ordinances of Government). Through an analysis of ideas of delegation and responsibility within these texts, the paper seeks to develop a critique of the place of revealed religious authority in the solution to the questions 'who are administrators responsible to?' and 'what are administrators responsible for?' © Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0033-3298en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Administrationen_US
dc.titleSituating administrative responsibility: A comparison of medival Christian and medieval Islamic administrative thoughten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJordan, SR:sjordan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJordan, SR=rp00551en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9299.2006.00602.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747183965en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747183965&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume84en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage563en_US
dc.identifier.epage581en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJordan, SR=23479888000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike803258-

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