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Article: The renegotiation of the social pact in Hong Kong: Economic globalisation, socio-economic change, and local politics

TitleThe renegotiation of the social pact in Hong Kong: Economic globalisation, socio-economic change, and local politics
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JSP
Citation
Journal Of Social Policy, 2005, v. 34 n. 2, p. 293-310 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article discusses the politics of social policy development in Hong Kong following the sian financial crisis. It examines the cause, mode and political significance of social policy reform in an Asian late industrialiser that has been experiencing the twin pressures of economic globalisation and socio-economic change. Financial austerity has prompted the state to adopt social policy reforms through re-commodification and cost containment, resulting in the retrenchment of the residual welfare state. The state's policy choices are structured by local politics, including the state of political development and the path dependence nature of policy change. The article questions the effectiveness of the social authoritarian approaches adopted by the state in attempting to renegotiate the social pact with its citizens, and contends that progressive development in social policy is inevitably bound to democratisation. © 2005 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171829
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.151
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, EWYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:43Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Social Policy, 2005, v. 34 n. 2, p. 293-310en_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-2794en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171829-
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses the politics of social policy development in Hong Kong following the sian financial crisis. It examines the cause, mode and political significance of social policy reform in an Asian late industrialiser that has been experiencing the twin pressures of economic globalisation and socio-economic change. Financial austerity has prompted the state to adopt social policy reforms through re-commodification and cost containment, resulting in the retrenchment of the residual welfare state. The state's policy choices are structured by local politics, including the state of political development and the path dependence nature of policy change. The article questions the effectiveness of the social authoritarian approaches adopted by the state in attempting to renegotiate the social pact with its citizens, and contends that progressive development in social policy is inevitably bound to democratisation. © 2005 Cambridge University Press.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JSPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Social Policyen_US
dc.titleThe renegotiation of the social pact in Hong Kong: Economic globalisation, socio-economic change, and local politicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, EWY:ewylee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EWY=rp00560en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0047279404008591en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-17344367095en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-17344367095&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage293en_US
dc.identifier.epage310en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228688700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, EWY=7406966424en_US

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