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Article: Living on the edge: Spanish Greens in the mid-1990s

TitleLiving on the edge: Spanish Greens in the mid-1990s
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09644016.asp
Citation
Environmental Politics, 1997, v. 6 n. 3, p. 168-175 How to Cite?
AbstractLike their opposite numbers in other European states, the Spanish greens have tended to fare very badly in state elections. In the most recent (1996) general election, the green parties stood on their own platform and secured more than 0.5% in only one of Spain's 17 electoral regions. In most others, they scored so poorly that their vote was not even recorded in official statistics. In recent years the greens have taken steps towards achieving greater political power by building alliances with centre-left parties, but at the cost of compromising their own principles and beliefs. This paper discusses some of the other 'external' obstacles impeding their progress into the political mainstream. The author argues that the future for green parties in Spain remains extremely bleak, even if internal philosophical wrangles were satisfactorily resolved. Only when the country becomes more integrated into the European Union and its political culture becomes more like that of other Member States will the Spanish political system becomes receptive to green political ideas.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171807
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.164
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.403

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHolliday, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:17:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:17:40Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Politics, 1997, v. 6 n. 3, p. 168-175en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-4016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171807-
dc.description.abstractLike their opposite numbers in other European states, the Spanish greens have tended to fare very badly in state elections. In the most recent (1996) general election, the green parties stood on their own platform and secured more than 0.5% in only one of Spain's 17 electoral regions. In most others, they scored so poorly that their vote was not even recorded in official statistics. In recent years the greens have taken steps towards achieving greater political power by building alliances with centre-left parties, but at the cost of compromising their own principles and beliefs. This paper discusses some of the other 'external' obstacles impeding their progress into the political mainstream. The author argues that the future for green parties in Spain remains extremely bleak, even if internal philosophical wrangles were satisfactorily resolved. Only when the country becomes more integrated into the European Union and its political culture becomes more like that of other Member States will the Spanish political system becomes receptive to green political ideas.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09644016.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Politicsen_US
dc.titleLiving on the edge: Spanish Greens in the mid-1990sen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHolliday, I:ian.holliday@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHolliday, I=rp00067en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031409915en_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage168en_US
dc.identifier.epage175en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolliday, I=7003868118en_US

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