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Article: The effect of pinealectomy on scoliosis development in young nonhuman primates

TitleThe effect of pinealectomy on scoliosis development in young nonhuman primates
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 2005, v. 30 n. 18, p. 2009-2013 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Design. Prospective study on pinealectomy in primates. Objective. To evaluate whether pinealectomy in a bipedal nonhuman primate model will result in the development of scoliosis. Summary of Background Data. Pinealectomy in newborn chickens consistently resulted in scoliosis development. Published data suggest that the surgical removal of the pineal, loss of melatonin secretion, and a bipedal posture are important elements in the development of scoliosis in lower animal models. Method. There were 18 rhesus monkeys between 8 and 11 months old that underwent pineal excision. All monkeys were kept in a regulated 12-hour light-dark cycle. Monthly radiographs assessed scoliosis development. Completeness of pineal excision was assessed by measurement of a major metabolite of melatonin in the urine, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay assessed. Results. Mean follow-up was 28 months (range 10-41). Seven monkeys died prematurely, and 71 survived to date; the data from those that died could still be used, although follow-up was shortened. At the latest follow-up or death, scoliosis did not develop in any of the monkeys. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin measurements revealed 3 patterns. Group 1 consisted of 10 monkeys, which showed definite evidence of complete pineal excision. Group 2 consisted of an uncertain group of 2 monkeys in which the nighttime melatonin level is slightly high. Group 3 consisted of 6 monkeys that had incomplete pineal excision or ectopic melatonin production. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pinealectomy in nonhuman primates. Of the 18 monkeys, 10 had a loss of melatonin secretion, for a mean of 29 months after surgery. Because none of the monkeys had scoliosis develop, this study strongly suggests that the possible etiologic factors producing idiopathic scoliosis in lower animals are different from primates, and findings in lower animals cannot necessarily be extrapolated to human beings. ©2005, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171736
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, AMSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarl, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorTranmer, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeong, JCYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:16:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:16:42Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2005, v. 30 n. 18, p. 2009-2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171736-
dc.description.abstractStudy Design. Prospective study on pinealectomy in primates. Objective. To evaluate whether pinealectomy in a bipedal nonhuman primate model will result in the development of scoliosis. Summary of Background Data. Pinealectomy in newborn chickens consistently resulted in scoliosis development. Published data suggest that the surgical removal of the pineal, loss of melatonin secretion, and a bipedal posture are important elements in the development of scoliosis in lower animal models. Method. There were 18 rhesus monkeys between 8 and 11 months old that underwent pineal excision. All monkeys were kept in a regulated 12-hour light-dark cycle. Monthly radiographs assessed scoliosis development. Completeness of pineal excision was assessed by measurement of a major metabolite of melatonin in the urine, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay assessed. Results. Mean follow-up was 28 months (range 10-41). Seven monkeys died prematurely, and 71 survived to date; the data from those that died could still be used, although follow-up was shortened. At the latest follow-up or death, scoliosis did not develop in any of the monkeys. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin measurements revealed 3 patterns. Group 1 consisted of 10 monkeys, which showed definite evidence of complete pineal excision. Group 2 consisted of an uncertain group of 2 monkeys in which the nighttime melatonin level is slightly high. Group 3 consisted of 6 monkeys that had incomplete pineal excision or ectopic melatonin production. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pinealectomy in nonhuman primates. Of the 18 monkeys, 10 had a loss of melatonin secretion, for a mean of 29 months after surgery. Because none of the monkeys had scoliosis develop, this study strongly suggests that the possible etiologic factors producing idiopathic scoliosis in lower animals are different from primates, and findings in lower animals cannot necessarily be extrapolated to human beings. ©2005, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythmen_US
dc.subject.meshMacaca Mulattaen_US
dc.subject.meshMelatonin - Secretionen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurosurgical Procedures - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshPineal Gland - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Perioden_US
dc.subject.meshScoliosis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpine - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleThe effect of pinealectomy on scoliosis development in young nonhuman primatesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC:cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPoon, AMS:amspoon@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK:hcm21000@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, AMS=rp00354en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.brs.0000179087.38730.5den_US
dc.identifier.pmid16166887en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-25444459144en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros111728-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-25444459144&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue18en_US
dc.identifier.spage2009en_US
dc.identifier.epage2013en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231885900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, T=7405564819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, AMS=7103068868en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarl, A=7006669383en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTranmer, B=7003820979en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Y=7407117836en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeong, JCY=35560782200en_US

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