File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

TitleChronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/NSG
Citation
Biological Signals And Receptors, 1998, v. 7 n. 6, p. 337-344 How to Cite?
AbstractIn studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (β-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171651
ISSN
2003 Impact Factor: 3.5
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDaunton, NGen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMan, SYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:16:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:16:09Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationBiological Signals And Receptors, 1998, v. 7 n. 6, p. 337-344en_US
dc.identifier.issn1422-4933en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171651-
dc.description.abstractIn studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (β-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/NSGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Signals and Receptorsen_US
dc.rightsBiological Signals and Receptors. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Physiologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Stem - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebellum - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshCholecystokinin - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshCorticosterone - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshEnkephalin, Methionine - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHypergravity - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNeuropeptides - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshSomatostatin - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSubstance P - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin-Releasing Hormone - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTissue Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshBeta-Endorphin - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleChronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellumen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, F:ftang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, F=rp00327en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid9873155-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032406065en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros44124-
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage337en_US
dc.identifier.epage344en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000077793500004-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDaunton, NG=6604018145en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, F=7201979770en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorcoran, ML=7102551163en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFox, RA=7403466048en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMan, SY=7103398069en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats