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Article: Power spectral analysis of respiratory responses to pharyngeal stimulation in cats: Comparisons with eupnoea and gasping

TitlePower spectral analysis of respiratory responses to pharyngeal stimulation in cats: Comparisons with eupnoea and gasping
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751
Citation
Journal Of Physiology, 1995, v. 485 n. 2, p. 551-559 How to Cite?
AbstractBased on similarities between properties of gasping and the aspiration reflex, we hypothesized that this reflex activates the central pattern generator for gasping. To evaluate this hypothesis, we have analysed high-frequency oscillations in phrenic and hypoglossal neural activities. These oscillations, analysed by power and coherence spectra, are considered as signatures of the central pattern generators for automatic ventilatory activity. In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralysed and ventilated cats, the aspiration reflex was elicited in eupnoea and gasping by mechanical stimulation of the pharynx and electrical stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Compared with eupnoeic values, the peaks in the power spectra occurred at higher frequencies in spontaneous gasping. Peaks in the coherence spectra showed identical changes. Power and coherence spectra of inspiratory neural activities during the aspiration reflex differed markedly from those of eupnoea, but were similar to those in gasping. We conclude that mechanical stimulation of the pharynx or electrical stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve activates a reflex by which the central pattern generator for eupnoea is depressed, and that for gasping is activated. Our results also support the concept that separate brainstem mechanisms generate ventilatory activity in eupnoea and gasping.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171621
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.731
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.670
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTomori, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonic, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorDonicova, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorSt John, WMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:16:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:16:01Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Physiology, 1995, v. 485 n. 2, p. 551-559en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3751en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171621-
dc.description.abstractBased on similarities between properties of gasping and the aspiration reflex, we hypothesized that this reflex activates the central pattern generator for gasping. To evaluate this hypothesis, we have analysed high-frequency oscillations in phrenic and hypoglossal neural activities. These oscillations, analysed by power and coherence spectra, are considered as signatures of the central pattern generators for automatic ventilatory activity. In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralysed and ventilated cats, the aspiration reflex was elicited in eupnoea and gasping by mechanical stimulation of the pharynx and electrical stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Compared with eupnoeic values, the peaks in the power spectra occurred at higher frequencies in spontaneous gasping. Peaks in the coherence spectra showed identical changes. Power and coherence spectra of inspiratory neural activities during the aspiration reflex differed markedly from those of eupnoea, but were similar to those in gasping. We conclude that mechanical stimulation of the pharynx or electrical stimulation of the glossopharyngeal nerve activates a reflex by which the central pattern generator for eupnoea is depressed, and that for gasping is activated. Our results also support the concept that separate brainstem mechanisms generate ventilatory activity in eupnoea and gasping.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCatsen_US
dc.subject.meshDecerebrate State - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshElectric Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHypoglossal Nerve - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPharynx - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhrenic Nerve - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshReflex - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Mechanics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVagotomyen_US
dc.titlePower spectral analysis of respiratory responses to pharyngeal stimulation in cats: Comparisons with eupnoea and gaspingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, ML:fungml@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, ML=rp00433en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7666374-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029066489en_US
dc.identifier.volume485en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage551en_US
dc.identifier.epage559en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RC21800022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTomori, Z=7005413045en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, ML=7101955092en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDonic, V=6603853690en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDonicova, V=6507521760en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSt John, WM=36831054200en_US

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