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Article: Medullary neuronal activities in gasping induced by pharyngeal stimulation and hypoxia

TitleMedullary neuronal activities in gasping induced by pharyngeal stimulation and hypoxia
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resphysiol
Citation
Respiration Physiology, 1995, v. 100 n. 3, p. 195-202 How to Cite?
AbstractWe examined the hypothesis that medullary respiratory-related and non-respiratory-related neuronal activities are similarly altered with the 'aspiration reflex', induced by mechanical stimulation of the epipharyngeal mucosa, and gasping, induced by severe hypoxia. Extracellular neuronal activities were recorded in decerebrate, paralyzed and ventilated cats. Phrenic activity and neuronal activities were monitored in eupnea and gasping. Seventy-one unit activities were recorded in the lateral medulla including the nucleus tractus solitorii (NTS), lateral tegmental field (LTF) and the nucleus ambiguus (NA). The respiratory modulation of a neuronal activity was quantified by a η 2 statistic (Orem, J. and Dick, T., 1983, J. Neurophysiol. 50: 1098-1107). The η 2 values of the units ranged from 0.02 to 0.93. Inspiratory-related activities with relative high η 2 values (n = 16) were recorded in the region closed to the NTS. Phase-spanning (n = 7) and expiratory related activities (n = 10) were recorded in the ventral medullary region. Units with low η 2 values (n = 29) and with no spontaneous activity (n = 9) in eupnea were recorded in the region of the LTF. In both 'aspiration reflex and gasping, inspiratory-related activities were augmented and expiratory-related activities were suppressed. Tonic units were activated and additional activities were recruited. The modulation of the neuronal activities to gasping induced by anoxia was identical to that induced by pharyngeal stimulation in either hyperoxia or severe hypoxia. We concluded that medullary gasping mechanism is recruited by pharyngeal stimulation. In addition, the present findings are compatible with the idea that different brainstem mechanisms are responsible for the control of eupnea and gasping.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171619
ISSN
2001 Impact Factor: 2.197
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTomori, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohn St, WMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:16:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:16:00Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationRespiration Physiology, 1995, v. 100 n. 3, p. 195-202en_US
dc.identifier.issn0034-5687en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171619-
dc.description.abstractWe examined the hypothesis that medullary respiratory-related and non-respiratory-related neuronal activities are similarly altered with the 'aspiration reflex', induced by mechanical stimulation of the epipharyngeal mucosa, and gasping, induced by severe hypoxia. Extracellular neuronal activities were recorded in decerebrate, paralyzed and ventilated cats. Phrenic activity and neuronal activities were monitored in eupnea and gasping. Seventy-one unit activities were recorded in the lateral medulla including the nucleus tractus solitorii (NTS), lateral tegmental field (LTF) and the nucleus ambiguus (NA). The respiratory modulation of a neuronal activity was quantified by a η 2 statistic (Orem, J. and Dick, T., 1983, J. Neurophysiol. 50: 1098-1107). The η 2 values of the units ranged from 0.02 to 0.93. Inspiratory-related activities with relative high η 2 values (n = 16) were recorded in the region closed to the NTS. Phase-spanning (n = 7) and expiratory related activities (n = 10) were recorded in the ventral medullary region. Units with low η 2 values (n = 29) and with no spontaneous activity (n = 9) in eupnea were recorded in the region of the LTF. In both 'aspiration reflex and gasping, inspiratory-related activities were augmented and expiratory-related activities were suppressed. Tonic units were activated and additional activities were recruited. The modulation of the neuronal activities to gasping induced by anoxia was identical to that induced by pharyngeal stimulation in either hyperoxia or severe hypoxia. We concluded that medullary gasping mechanism is recruited by pharyngeal stimulation. In addition, the present findings are compatible with the idea that different brainstem mechanisms are responsible for the control of eupnea and gasping.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resphysiolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRespiration Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnoxia - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCatsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHyperoxia - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHypoventilation - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInhalation - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedulla Oblongata - Cytology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurons - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPharynx - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReflex - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSignal Transductionen_US
dc.titleMedullary neuronal activities in gasping induced by pharyngeal stimulation and hypoxiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, ML:fungml@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, ML=rp00433en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0034-5687(94)00141-Len_US
dc.identifier.pmid7481108-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029002171en_US
dc.identifier.volume100en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage195en_US
dc.identifier.epage202en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RF62600003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, ML=7101955092en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTomori, Z=7005413045en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohn St, WM=36831184400en_US

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